Fixed Gear Friday: Swobo Sanchez Frameset Review

I got this Swobo Sanchez Frame set for Father’s day from Banning’s Bikes in Fullerton. I had been riding the Raleigh One Way, but unfortunately the frame was a tad too big for me. I transferred the wheels, crankset, chain and pedals from the One Way to the Sanchez, I installed a shortened MTB flat bar, a carbon fiber post and a Brooks Saddle.

Thumbs up:I really like riding the Sanchez. The frame is comfortable and rides super smooth. The galvanized finish gives it a different look and I don’t have to worry much about scratches. The Swobo comes with no brakes, but the front fork is drilled for one and not wanting to become pavement tortilla, I installed an XTR lever matted to a Powertools brake caliper. Stopping power is awesome.

Thumbs Down:The bike is not drilled for water bottle cages, so I ended up installing one on the handlebars. My commute is 21 miles round trip so I do have a need for hydration.

Do I recommend the Sanchez? In a world full of conversions and Pistas, the Sanchez dares to be different. Although the complete bike is a little trendy for my taste, buying the frameset and building it up to one’s liking is totally recommendable.

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  1. russ roca December 21, 2007 3:07 pm 

    Does it have drillings for a rear brake?

  2. Moe December 21, 2007 3:26 pm 

    Nope, front brake only.

  3. tj December 24, 2007 11:24 am 

    The other day, I saw a Pista without toe clips and without a front brake. I thought it was a fluke — maybe a beginner learning to ride a fixed gear bike. In pic #1, your pedals appear to be standard platforms (not clipless). So I’m curious. How do you stop a bike on a setup like that?

  4. Ghost Rider December 24, 2007 3:55 pm 

    Although it’s not a great idea to ride a fixed-gear bike without some type of foot-retention device AND without a brake, it is not impossible to stop said setup…you’ve just got to anticipate stops earlier and apply backpressure accordingly.

    Platforms are good for folks just learning a fixed gear, but it is even better to learn using all the proper equipment (toe clips/ clipless pedals) at once.

  5. Arleigh December 27, 2007 6:28 am 

    With the steel look I would recommend a set of hose clamps to mount your bottle cage to one of your tubes.

    I had to do the same thing with my Bianchi Pista years ago. For long rides I also mounted a “tri” under saddle 2 bottle holder that comes out of the back of the saddle.

  6. Ghost Rider December 27, 2007 7:31 am 

    Good idea…Sugino or Minoura make stainless steel waterbottle clamps for bikes without braze-on fittings, too. They’re expensive for what they are, but they are a touch more elegant than a standard hose clamp.

    Here they are:

    Velo Orange also sells TA branded clamps and some generic chromed steel ones (but those rust REALLY quickly).

  7. Moe December 28, 2007 2:40 pm 

    I have installed a set of Crank Bros Quattro pedals, I will look into the water bottle clamp option when I get back to LA.

  8. Andy December 14, 2008 1:03 pm 

    Looks like the bike does have drillings for a rear brake. Just spoke to Swobo and they said any short-reach (39mm) brake will work.

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