Peace Coffee Review: Guatemalan Organic Dark Roast

This week’s coffee review is the Guatemalan Organic Dark Roast

Here are the specs:

Hang with a smooth Guatemalan. Well-rounded and complete. Layers of deep solidarity from a dark roasted chocolate place. A fat favorite all around. Big.

Roast Level: Dark
Acidity: Medium – Low
Body: Heavy
Aroma: Dark chocolate
Flavor Notes: Bitter-sweet chocolate with dark roast smokiness and a slight remainder of citrus.

Farmer Cooperatives: ADIPCO, Apecaform, Nahuala, Rio Azul & Chajulense

Here’s how the beans look. Now I’m no Starbucks Barista but from what I’ve learned over the years, the darker the roast the more visible oil is on the bean. It’s hard to tell from the photo, but these beans are glistening as if they’ve been sunbathing on the beach with baby oil.

Once the beans were grounded, the sweet scent of a fine dark chocolate hits the air. Eventually the whole room smells awesome.

Much like the last reviews we did with Peace Coffee, the French Press has been the standard for the test. Look how rich the coffee looks. You just can’t get that with an automatic drip. Oh and here’s the thing, I TRIED to use my Mr. Coffee Auto Drip machine for this test…you know to be different. But those machines literally murder the flavor and texture of the coffee. It wasn’t until I used the press that the flavors came back to life and greeted my taste buds.
french press

What’s great about using a press is you get a full bodied and richer coffee. Usually if you use a drip machine, the coffee looks more like a shiny dark tea. But the press gives you texture, flavors and that nice little frothy foam..

So here’s how this coffee did…the specs show that this has a bitter sweet chocolate flavor. As I sipped my cup of sweetness…well not really since its a dark roast and it was black…anyhow, the certain flavors do jump out then lounge on your tongue; think of a Dove Dark Chocolate Bar. If you’ve ever had one of those then you’ll understand that this is the exact flavor the Guatemalan provides. It’s smooth, rich…oh wait, I already said that, and overall delicious. Though it’s a dark roast it doesn’t mean that it is super bitter. No, not at all — what happens is when you drink this, you do get the smokey flavor that it has been roasted longer than other beans, but it’s not like it is a kick in the mouth where you feel violated because the “dark roast” is taking advantage of your mouth. No the Guatemalan is very smooth and easy to drink. Acidity level is rated at low to medium, not bad considering darker roasts typically have a higher level. Plus I never experienced any stomach aches or heartburn after drinking it.

From this coffee lover to another, my gift to everyone reading is this review. You really have to give Peace Coffee a try. I’ve been really blown away on their coffees. They’re nice people too! Peace sells the Guatemalan Organic Dark Roast for about $9.99 per pound, and I guarantee that you won’t be disappointed!


  1. Palm Beach Bike Tours June 25, 2008 8:30 am 

    Coffee porn… What lovely beans!

    My church is involved with a Guatemalan orphanage that helps support itself by producing and selling coffee. Our mission trips always come back from there with a couple hundred pounds of beans. It is some really good coffee!

    While a dark, thick roast tastes yummy, it reduces the caffeine level of the beverage. Roasting coffee ‘boils’ off the caffeine. The longer and darker the roast, the less caffeine.

    Dark roasts are good in the evening and with desert but I prefer a light roast and its higher caffeine levels for breakfast and throughout the day, junkie that I am.


  2. End Pavement June 25, 2008 1:15 pm 

    I’ve always been fascinated by the coffee press but haven’t yet done the research to know what I’m looking at before buying one.

    I got to drinking tea rather than coffee for the last few months, but this might well tempt me back to the dark side. :)

  3. nicole June 25, 2008 1:38 pm 

    i bought their breakfast blend after your first review and absolutely LOVE it! thanks for the heads up.

    and just as an fyi, after you factor in shipping, the coffee comes out to around $12.50 for a pound. still well worth it, though. :)

  4. Palm Beach Bike Tours June 25, 2008 5:38 pm 

    End: There is nothing to buying a coffee press. There are really only two differences, size and ease of cleaning.

    Just pick up a cheap one (the two-cup model can be had at your local Target for under $20) and it’ll last for years. The only place where people screw it up is in grinding their coffee too fine. Coarse — very coarse — coffee grounds are required.


  5. barbated June 25, 2008 6:48 pm 

    For french press coffee, it is best to grind the beans coarse with a burr grinder. They are expensive, but coffee shops usually have them and will grind it for you. If you want a good french press look at bodum. French press is definately the way to go. It is cheap and makes a much better cup of coffee than drip. I think it is actually stronger than most espresso drinks.

  6. The Outlaw Kyle July 1, 2008 6:24 pm 

    I concur with barbated. Use a burr grinder, and more course grind then pictured. I have a Zassenhaus, and it’s great. Get the “Knee” model as you’ll end up holding it there where you get the smooth edges or not. Cheers!

  7. Dark Chocolate July 3, 2008 10:59 pm 

    A chocolate fountain will hold white chocolate, dark chocolate, or a mixture of both. Chocolate is specially formulated for use in the chocolate fountain, meaning that it will have no problem streaming down the tiers of the fountain.

  8. Jon August 10, 2008 12:03 pm 

    Actually, the only “real” way to make coffee is to toss the grounds into the cup, pour add your cream and whatever you sweaten with (if you use the stuff), and the pour in the boiling water. Use far more coffee than you think you will need. Wait a few minutes for the grounds to absorb the water, and drink. The grounds sink when they have given up their flavor, leaving you with _always_ perfectly-brewed coffee. I learned this from my Polish friends (That’s how Poles learned to drink coffee after the lifting the Turkish seige of Vienna a few centuries ago), and after getting used to always having a few grounds end up in my mouth or teeth, could never go back. Presses are for wussies. 😉 My other favorite method is a stove-top express.


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