Interbike 2008 Video: NuVinci Hub

Last year we had the chance to review the first iteration of this hub. Here’s the President of the company explaining the hub and its improvements.


13 Comments

  1. Raiyn October 1, 2008 12:04 am 

    I keep threatening to build up a rainy day commuter with that hub.

  2. Ghost Rider October 1, 2008 5:19 am 

    Dang, those are some big balls!

    Very cool idea to make a “developer’s kit”…and smart idea to marry the NuVinci technology to an e-bike for increased battery life and range. I suspect that’s the big stumbling block for e-bikes — friction and transmission losses that eat battery life. If those losses can be reduced, the range would increase greatly!

  3. cafn8 October 1, 2008 6:26 am 

    Mmm. Nice hub. Good range of gearing. I think I could pass on the auto shifting, though. On the other hand, with a CVT I might not rule it out. For a masher like myself it might even mean longer life for the hub by controlling the torque in favor of higher revs. It’s nice to see that they’re bringing the weight down too.

  4. Iron Man October 1, 2008 6:32 am 

    “My primitive mind can’t grasp these concepts.”
    ~Unfrozen Caveman Lawyer

    There’s some science going on there that I don’t get, but it’s cool. One question I have is what’s the cadence like on that system? Is it good for guys who like to spin (me) or folks that push a bigger gear? He briefly touched on the subject, but didn’t get into the details. If I like to spin at 95 rpm, but the system prefers 75 rpm I’d be a little annoyed. Yes, that’s big time roadie nerd, but I’m curious all the same.

  5. Moe October 1, 2008 6:39 am 

    You will be able to program the system to whatever cadence you desire.

  6. Iron Man October 1, 2008 7:50 am 

    Thanks Moe, that’s interesting. Is it programmable on the fly? As there are times when I rely on differing cadences. Such as climbing. While seated I like to spin, when I stand I click a couple gears up lowering the cadence. I realize this is not a racing system and my concerns might be overkill, but I do live in some hilly terrain, the Ozarks, and hills pop up on the most leisurely of rides too.

  7. Lead Man October 1, 2008 8:28 am 

    I don’t know….it seems to me they are trying to turn bicycles into cars. A bicycle should be a simple means of transportation. I little exersise won’t hurt people in North America. I still like the fixed gear….simple and no worries about gear changing….just work my body differently depending on terrain.

  8. Moe October 1, 2008 8:58 am 

    It is not programmable on the fly, it is my understanding that you will connect the gadget to your pc and you can then set different ‘profiles’ which can be changed on the fly.

  9. Awgie October 1, 2008 9:21 am 

    If you stick with the mechanical shifter, it’ll always be “programmable” on the fly….It takes some getting used to but it’s neat, I bought the Cadillac Cruiser equipped model when Costco ran a deal, got a bike for just over the price of the built up wheel!

  10. MattG October 2, 2008 2:16 am 

    Lead Man, I’m going to disagree. I think that the emphasis here is on transportation. I love my singlespeed, but I live on the coastal plain. If you’re looking to sell to a wider audience, then making it more “regular guy” friendly is all to the good. I think human/electric hybrids are destined to replace a LOT of cars.

  11. Martin October 4, 2008 1:28 am 

    I wasn’t getting good video feed, but a simple device to maintain constant cadence would be very useful. More useful (for me) if it was all based around the rear hub as my front and back sections detach – it looked like there was a big box on the handlebars, but at least that would be easier to mount than the manual controller would be.

  12. Susan October 18, 2008 5:54 am 

    This is the SCHAZIZZLE! I have the Ellsworth THE RIDE with this transmission.. I can only say.. it is truly.. amazing.. fun to ride…

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