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A nice article about one of my very favorite world cities — Minneapolis — caught my eye today. Here it is, straight from the Winnipeg Free Press:

Think it’s futile to build up a massive cycling network because of frosty winter temperatures?

One of Winnipeg’s U.S. neighbours has proven a bit of snow and sub-zero winds don’t mean a city can’t be a top cycling spot.

Minneapolis is at the forefront of urban cycling and is among a handful of North American cities considered leaders in building a network of paths that encourage recreational and commuter travel. About 3.5 per cent of Minneapolis residents bike to work, and the city is on track to increase that to seven per cent in the next two years.

Take a look at the full article by clicking here.

It has long mystified me that many of the top bike-friendly cities in the U.S. are plagued with less-than-favorable weather. Minneapolis has cold and snow, Portland has a lot of wetness, Chicago gets downright cold and windy…meanwhile, bike commuters exist in relatively tiny percentages in more fair-weather areas. Florida and California should be at the top of the heap for year-round bicycling dominance, but they’re not. As the article above points out, it’s not just about weather, but the attitudes and forethought of city planners that make or break a city when it comes to bicycle friendliness. And, of course, the character of the riders themselves…a heaping helping of “can do” attitude goes a long way in beating the weather nasties.