Review: Two bike locks from Masterlock

A couple months ago, Masterlock offered to send two of their bike locks to us for testing and review. We chose a U-lock and a cable lock, and received the 8170D Force U-Lock and the 8220D Cable lock.

We told the folks at Masterlock that we didn’t have a “bait bike” to really test these locks out with, but that we would engage in a bit of destructive testing, where applicable. They were cool with that. More on that in a bit.

First, the cable lock:

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From the manufacturer’s website:

–Set-your-own password combination cable
–Use letters to create a memorable word combination
–Easy to set & reset
–6′ (1.8m) long x 3/8″ (10mm) diameter braided steel cable for strong cut resistance
–Protective vinyl coating helps prevent scratching
–Mounting bracket included for easy transportation

This lock is perfect for quick, low-crime lockups — as you may know, cables aren’t particularly resistant to cutting and are usually recommended for times when a bike will be unattended for a short time (quick trips into the store, or as a backup for another lock). What’s novel about the 8220D is its use of user-resettable word codes rather than numbers. I had a bit of fun coming up with odd words; my favorite being “STASI” (Cold War-era East German Secret Police).

The lock comes with a carrier bracket for mounting to your bike’s frame or seatpost. My seatpost is clogged with stuff, so I went for a frame mounting. The bracket has a push-button quick release and a corresponding “cleat” on the cable itself to stow the cable for travel.

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The carrier bracket seems a little chintzy (as do the lock brackets from most brands ), but the cable itself is lightweight. The bracket should be able to withstand this sort of weight. If you choose not to use the bracket, the cable coils up into a neat package for storage in your panniers or backpack.

As this is a cable, there was no point in attacking it with tools. I’ve seen (and experienced) much stouter cables cut with simple hand tools. Again, think of cable locks as a low-crime “quickie” or a backup to a beefier lock, and you’ll be fine.

Next up is the Force U-Lock:

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Specs from the manufacturer:

–Fusion U-lock
–Hardened steel body resists cutting, sawing and prying.
–Double locking shackle for superior pry resistance.
–Disc key for superior pick resistance.
–Vinyl coating for weather and scratch resistance.
–Carrier bracket included for convenient storage.

On paper, the 8170D seems like a good enough lock: good keyway type (disc rather than tubular) and the features one would expect from a sturdy bike lock. In practice, however, this one is perhaps not so tough. The first alarm bell was “hey, no anti-theft guarantee?” Surely, not all locks come with such a guarantee, but that guarantee has become the industry hallmark for a tough lock, and the lack of it should tell you something about the quality of any given lock.

Size-wise, the body is wide enough to swallow the front wheel, the frame and a secure post. Remember that the more space you take up within the U, the less room a thief’s prying tools have to work with.

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The mounting bracket, as may be expected, was fairly useless. I’ve never seen a serious cyclist use one, as most of them lack security over bumps or are made of flimsy materials. The included bracket here was no exception; it hogged a lot of frame space and comes with a cheap metal cam to secure the lock within the bracket’s body. I bent the cam lever the first time I used it and still couldn’t get the U-lock securely into its slot. Do yourself a favor: just bungee the lock to your rear rack, toss it into your pannier, or do as I do and leave a U-lock at all your common lockup points (I’ve got U-locks scattered all over the city).

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Now, onto “destructive testing”. I’ve got a sizeable tool collection, and what I was going to try with this lock was a series of tests, starting with bolt cutters, then a hacksaw, then a prying tool or bottle jack, and finally an electric cutoff wheel. First up: 24″ bolt cutters with a jaw capacity of 10mm.

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Let’s get something clear right up front — many of you know that I am not a particularly large or muscular person. At my heaviest, I weigh somewhere under 150 pounds. Well, it came as a shock, then, when I applied a bit of force to the handles of my bolt cutters, I could feel the jaws digging right into the steel of the U-bar! I peeled off some of the vinyl coating and discovered two clear indentation in the steel. I moved my tool over to the other side of the shackle, braced one cutter handle against the ground and pumped a couple times with about 50% of my body weight. SNAP! The jaws clamped shut onto empty space!

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At this point, the lock was defeated; so rather than trying the other tools, I called it a day.

Let’s be clear about another important point: ANY lock can be defeated given enough time and and arsenal of tools. The toughest lock on Earth is no match to an electric cutoff wheel…but in my humble opinion, a U-lock should be able to withstand a fairly casual application of bolt cutters. Let’s say, then, that this Masterlock U should only be used for “moderate security”…perhaps where there is nosy foot traffic near the lockup point, or a lowish-crime area. This is NOT an overnighter’s lock, in other words.

Retail price for each lock is right around $16.00. That’s pretty cheap! Are there better locks on the market? Of course — in the lock world, you do get what you pay for. Both of these locks are suitable for casual, quick lockups…but neither lock would I trust to secure my prized bikes overnight or in high-crime areas.

Not sold on these models, but are a fan of the brand itself? Have no fear: Masterlock does have a number of other locks in its stable, including stout ones with sizeable anti-theft guarantees. Check out the rest of their lineup by visiting their website.

Please click here to read our review disclaimer as required by the Federal Trade Commission.


5 Comments

  1. Raiyn July 23, 2013 12:00 am 

    I’m approaching year 9 of my ʞɔoן ɹǝʇsɐɯ boycott. I will never buy another of their products again so long as I live after the way I was treated by them.

    Kryptonite on the other hand has earned my business and will have it for the forseeable future. I had the pleasure of dealing with Kryptonite / Ingersoll Rand customer service in the first days of the BiC debacle which I have to say was the best experience I’ve yet had handling a problem with a corporation. (Oddly enough Microsoft support in both the Windows and Xbox depts. comes very close) Even before Kryptonite really knew what was going on or had a real plan of action they were forthright and direct in dealing with the issue, and never failed to give me up to the moment information.

  2. Paul Hossfield July 23, 2013 9:16 am 

    I’ve used a cable lock for years. Nothing but a good 6″ cable from Home Depot + a padlock. I figure you can only deter casual theft anyway. Never had a bike stolen, but then I don’t live in NYC. That said I’ve locked it & left it for hours in some pretty dicey parts of Providence RI.

  3. Ghost Rider July 23, 2013 11:02 am 

    And I had the heaviest cable Kryptonite makes (12mm braided) last exactly 2 hours in what I thought at the time was a low-crime area. Cut in twain like a stick of butter.

    Luckily, it was a backup to a much heavier U lock, and only the vinyl covering of that lock got chewed up by whatever the miscreants used to part my cable. I was able to recover the padlock, at least. And my bike was still there…

  4. Mike Myers July 26, 2013 3:10 am 

    Master Lock doesn’t have the best track record with bike locks. Remember the “Cuffs”, or whatever they were called? Seemed like a good idea—compact, easy to carry, and turned out to be very easy to defeat.

    I think most locks are only used to discourage lazy thieves. If a thief wants your bike badly enough, they can defeat a Kryptonite NYC chain!

    Best theft deterrent is an ugly bike. LOL

  5. David September 4, 2013 10:45 am 

    I use a big honking Abus motorcycle lock at work. It’s too heavy to carry around, so I leave it in place (unless i’m taking an actual motorcycle trip, in which case I bring it to protect my beloved Valkyrie). I’m convinced it’s virtually indestructible to a bicycle thief – or at least so hard to defeat they’d just leave it.

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