Category: Bike Share

Holla Bike Commuters: break out your cardigan sweaters and flat-heeled boots, cycle ladies, and for you DC cycle gents, maybe your oxfords and V-neck sweaters! It’s Capital bike time… For those of you in the DC area, come check out the National Bike Summit and the National Women’s Bicycling Forum March 3-5, 2014. I’ll be there, lurking, casually… and attending related free-events as much as possible!

Don’t be turned off by the storm, see you there!

Registration is closed online, but still available on site.

I’ll be weaseling my way into the 4pm event this afternoon. If you’re in the hood and looking for a last minute excuse to pedal power before the storm hits, join us!


Capital Bikeshare bikes at DuPont Circle



National Bike Summit 2014
March 3-5, 2014

Printable Agenda Available Here 


Online registration is now closed. You can register on-site at the Renaissance Hotel in Washington, D.C., on March 3.

Sunday, March 2

4 – 7 p.m.

Media Training For Bicycle Advocates
Renaissance Hotel: Congressional B
Whether you’re showing off a new bike lane, drumming up support for federal bike funding, or calling attention to a safety hazard on your corner, you’ve got a story to tell about biking. Reporters want to help you tell that story — but you need to know how to work with them. Or, you can tell that story yourself! Join us for the first-ever National Bike Summit media training — hosted by the League of American Bicyclists, Streetsblog and Streetfilms — on Sunday, March 2, from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Renaissance DC (999 9th St NW). Read more and register.

7 – 9 p.m.

Streetsblog party! 
We love meeting our readers and bringing together our online community in real life. We’ll be hanging out post-media training at RFD (Regional Food & Drink) in the back bar. We’ll provide some yummy appetizers, and RFD’s full menu of entrees is available if you’ve worked up a serious appetite. RSVP hereRFD back bar, 810 7th St. NW (two blocks from the Summit hotel). $10 at the door gets you a free drink.

Cycle Ladies and Gents of Bike Commuters, please give a warm welcome to our newest staff writer and lady commuter… Emily Shellabarger (a.k.a. Shelly, to Mir.I.Am) commuting in the Bay Area, California! While Emily warms up her fingertips for some intense keyboard-slamming action for 2014, here’s a little guest post to give you a taste of the new bike share program in the Bay Area.

San Franciscans have watched enviously as bike share programs started cropping up in other metropolitan areas from New York to Washington DC, London to Paris. Finally, our turn came this summer with the much anticipated launch of the Bay Area Bike Share program. The network of bikes and docking stations spans the peninsula from San Francisco to San Jose, spattering a handful of cities between the two “San” bookends.

bay aear bike share

Personally, I was stoked to see the chunky, seafoam green bikes arrive in San Francisco––in particular, the double rack right next to the 4th & King street train station, which I visit daily on my commute down the peninsula. The docking racks have been strategically planted near various CalTrain stops to facilitate the last leg of a car-less commute, including my stop in Redwood City. I thought, “I must be the target user!” and wasted no time formulating my shared-bike commute plans.

Redwood City Caltrain Station

Bay Area Bike Share at the Caltrain Station in Redwood City… Look at them, so SEAFOAMY!

With further investigation I discovered both my homebase in the foggy city and my nine-to-five destination are not in the Bike Share network! Oh-so-close, but not close enough. The bike coverage is fairly limited both in San Francisco and the peninsula outlets. However, if you’re looking to ride within a confined radius or run a quick out-and-back errand, the shared bike option will do you just fine.

Bay Area Bike Share Locations

See the little Shelly on the map? Now how to get that Shelly down to the little building in the Peninsula, without bike hauling on and off the Caltrain… Bay Area Bike Share = sadly, almost there.

Currently, the San Francisco peninsula geographic expanse is served by only 70 sations with 700 bikes––doesn’t seem like enough, especially considering 35 of those stations are in San Francisco alone. Luckily, the program will bump up to 100 stations with 1,000 bikes this coming year, adding more stations in San Francisco’s most bikeable neighborhoods and a few more peninsula cities. My neighborhood isn’t on the list yet, but the neighborhood expansion is a start. For now, I’ll have to stick with hauling my bike on and off the CalTrain and save the shared bikes for special trips.

Bay Area Bike Share Locations Peninsula

Errrrrckkkkk. (Squeaky brake sound.) So close, but not enough stations yet to merit leaving Stallion behind.

Well, it sounds like everyone has to start somewhere, let’s hope the Bay Area Bike Share is responsive to user feedback, so we can all high-five for another successful bike share on the map. I felt the same way when I visited San Francisco last time… no bikes anywhere near my sister’s place in the Mission, but it makes more sense that the program is targeted towards Peninsula commuters. Any readers out there had a chance to try out the system? Let us know in the comments box, below!

We’ve seen more and more cities roll out bike-sharing schemes, from Divvy to CitiBike, from Velib to Mejor en Bici. We LOVE bike shares, and we’ve seen them be wild successes and dismal failures.

You know what? There’s a new guide out that can help cities develop programs on the “wild success” side of the coin. The guide was created by the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP):

More than 600 cities around the globe have bike share systems, and new systems are starting every year. The largest and most successful systems, in places such as China, Paris, London, and Washington, D.C., have helped to promote cycling as a viable and valued transport option.

This guide evaluates international best practice in bike share, helps to bridge the divide between developing and developed countries’ experiences to provide guidance on planning and implementing a successful bike share system regardless of the location, size, or density of your city.

mejor en b

Read some highlighst of the guide by visiting this Treehugger page, or download the 152-page PDF guide directly from the ITDP here.

As many of you may know, we’re big fans of bike sharing schemes around here. And we’re pretty fascinated by the inner workings of such bike share programs.


Now, here’s a bit of a teaser into Chicago’s Divvy Bikes. There’s not a ton of detail, but still an interesting short read:

There are no signs or banners on this nondescript industrial warehouse in West Town to indicate that the 18,000-square-foot structure is headquarters for what could soon become the largest commuter cycling system in the country.

“It’s intentional,” Divvy Deputy General Manager Elliot Greenberger said. “We’re off the radar.”

Read the full article by visiting the RedEye Chicago page.

So Matt must’ve been dreaming of sunny days and bad traffice in Waikiki when he sent me this article reblogged from the Honolulu Star Advertiser: Hawaii Tries To Solve Transportation Mess With Bike-Sharing Recommended.

The article interviews a local bike commuter who works at the Hilton who apparently reduces a Friday night typical hour-long traffic-jammed no-aloha car commute to a simple 15 minute bike ride to his house in Kaimuki.  Maybe an exaggeration, but maybe not? I’ve never driven through Waikiki on a Friday at pau hana.


The rest of the article talks about possible solutions –  (mostly TheBarfBus related), including a bike share program. Bike share has been on the brain forever on Oahu, with some pilot stations up and running in Kailua by B-Cycle.

The study found Waikiki already has urgent transportation problems, including unreliable bus service, traffic congestion and a shortage of parking spaces, Frysztacki said.

“Right now, a lot of the traffic mix in Waikiki is unnecessary,” Frysztacki said. “For example, we found empty taxis trolling for fares on Kuhio Avenue in the morning and afternoon. In other cities, they’ve found that people looking for parking make up about 30 percent of the traffic.”

The study recommended corrective actions including:

–Provide more frequent bus service to Waikiki with fewer stops.

–Implement pre-boarding bus fare payment and all-door boarding.

–Coordinate bus information with improved signage and electronic displays.

–Create a 7-mile pedestrian and bicycle core network that considers building pedestrian and bike paths over the Ala Wai.

–Implement bike sharing.

–Emphasize early morning deliveries.

–Provide real-time parking information displays.

Waikiki is almost another animal, apart from the rest of the island. But for those of us who live in Honolulu, or those of us who commute through Waiks, or for those of us who have visited and wished for better traffic patterns… keep your fingers crossed for some bike share action in the future. Maybe better bike share and transit options will roll around eventually!

Or you could do what I did on my first visit and contact HBL, they will hook you up with all your bikey connections in the meantime…