Category: bike train

Since I published the article for the Vigurvant, we were then approached by the folks from Companion Bike Seats to see about testing their rear rack/bike seat.

Here’s a short description:

A Companion Bike Seat gives your bike many of the same features of expensive cargo bikes and utility bikes, but is easy to install and works on most existing bikes, and some ebikes and motorized bicycles as well!

Not only is there a locking stash-box for your belongings, but Companion Bike Seats support passengers up to 200 pounds. Start a daily bike commuter “bike-pool.” Pick your kids up from school on your bike. Ride your bike to the bar instead of taking a cab, and you can still bring someone home with you!

companion bike seat

After checking out their site, I was really intrigued by the whole idea of being able to carry full grown adult and a sandwich in the storage compartment. So after a few email exchanges, Paul O’Leary agreed to send a test unit over. I’ll most likely use it with the Vigurvant pedals. It would actually make sense for both of of these companies to work together and see if they can do a combo deal.Anyhow, I’m looking forward to the Companion and we’ll report back to you on our findings.

Have any of our readers taken part in a “bike train”? We wrote about Portland bike trains back in 2011. A “bike train” is when a group of commuters come together for safety. While our article pertains to bike trains of schoolchildren getting together to ride to school (led by a parent or other adults, in most cases), it’s interesting to learn that the concept is becoming more popular.

The other day, I spotted the following article on NPR’s “All Things Considered”:

One of the largest obstacles in getting people to bike to work is their fear of getting hit by a car. A new grass-roots project in Los Angeles is helping folks navigate the ins and outs of traffic.

It’s 6:45 a.m. and Barbara Insua is busy packing a bag. She will ride seven miles from her home in Pasadena to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab, where she works as a graphic designer. She only started doing this ride a few months ago.

“It was kind of daunting,” she says, “because seven miles to the lab — I didn’t know how to do it. I’m not an avid cyclist.”

Enter L.A. Bike Trains — an organization that arranges commutes by bike in groups.

Read the rest of the article or listen to the audiocast by clicking here. This sounds like a really cool concept, and one I’d like to try. In my experience as a commuter, I’ve only taken part in group commuting rides during Bike To Work Month — it seemed like folks would go out of their way to get together to ride during such special events, but not other times.


Arranging bike trains should be relatively easy, and I look forward to seeing more of these happening around the U.S. Safety is in numbers for cyclists!

We published a link to the following article on our Facebook page, and it’s worth sharing here, too.

Biking with kids is all the rage in Portland these days, but biking with six kids between the ages of 2 and 11? That’s something I never would have thought possible before I met southeast Portland resident Emily Finch.

Finch, 34, is a powerhouse. Watching her pedal her bakfiets cargo bike with four kids in the front, another one in a child seat behind her, and another one on a bike attached to hers via the rear rack, is a sight that not only inspires — it forces you to re-think what’s possible.

Read the rest of the article and see more pics over at

(Photos © J. Maus/BikePortland)

As the article mentions, and as we’ve talked about repeatedly here — if you have the will and the desire to incorporate two wheels into your life, it CAN be done! I’ve met too many people “on the fence” about bike commuting…many of whom get hung up in logistical concerns or questions about what to do with their kids/clothes/appearance/safety/etc. While not everyone can forgo a car and switch to a bike (we understand that and accept that, believe it or not), there are still a LOT of people out there who could do it if they only put their minds to it.

Did you know that Full Speed Ahead (FSA) does commuter stuff? Well here’s a great start, this is the Metropolis Patterson Transmission. It sorta reminds me of the Truvativ HammerSchmidt cranks.

They have a whole line of Metropolis components available for the urban rider. This bike is a perfect example on how its equipped with the groupo.


Two of our favorite people in the biking world would be Russ Roca and Laura Crawford. Russ was one of our staff writers and in 2009, he and Laura set out on an adventure on two wheels. I had always admired what they have done and figured what they are about to do should be pretty darn fun and exciting. Check out the latest plans from The Path Less Pedaled.

You can read more about it on The Path Less Pedaled.