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Commute

Hooky part 2

Since Lance said it was OK to take a day off (My boss will be calling you soon), I decided to take my girls to breakfast to one of their (and mine) favorite places.

I hooked up the Copilot trailer to the KHS Tandemania Sport for our 2 mile round trip.

Luckily, the recently built shopping center has places to park the bikes.

The girls loved the ride, I got a decent workout and the car stayed home. That’s what I call a win-win-win situation!!

There’s not enough bicycling education available for kids

Either the parents of the kids at my daughter’s school are really dumb or these kids are simply don’t have a clue about the basics of riding a bike.

Number one basic is the use of helmets. Some kids straight out don’t wear them. Now that’s the kid’s fault but the responsibility of the parent to make sure they do. However, I also believe that the school needs to enforce it…after all it is a law.

Locking a bike seems to be optional at my daughter’s school. On any given day you’ll see nice mountain and BMX bikes not locked. If I really wanted to I could easily grab one and take it home.

Riding on the bike lane is another basic rule that kids don’t know about. I see a bunch of them riding on sidewalks and going the opposite direction.

Thinking back to when I was a kid, we had bike rodeos and usually a police officer would teach the kids the hand signals, rules of the road and the basics of bike riding. Either our government has taken money out of the schools systems which prevents teaching kids about bikes or their parents just don’t have a clue. At a certain point, as parents we can’t rely on the school systems to teach our kids about everything….heck they’re already learning about sex as part of “growth and development classes.” As parents, bike rider or not, if you are going to give your kid a bike, you need to learn about being a responsible bicyclist and you have the obligation to pass that on to your kids.

Could Bike Commuting Help You Get Promoted?

In my opinion, yes. Here’s a few reasons why. For starters when you ride your bike in or do any type of exercise, your body release all sorts of goodness into your brain to help you feel more at peace, invigorated and basically feel way better about yourself. This stuff is called endorphins and seratonin.

So with all that goodness being released into your body while riding your bike, think about the kind of attitude and productivity you’ll have once you sit down at your desk. I once had a job where I was hired on as a Marketing Associate. I then started commuting to work, 17 miles each way 2-3 times per week and then within a month, I was promoted to the Marketing Manager, and a month after that, Marketing Director.

Bike commuting helped me deal with my job in a different way. I remember when I would have to drive, I would already be tired as I pulled up to the parking lot and wasn’t as productive during the day. But if I rode, all the factors of the bike commute played into my better work habits. Not only did the cool air wake me up, but I was also getting a workout and I felt free. Bike commuting did quite a bit for my attitude and of course my health. I was just happier on the days that I rode.

When the CEO would see my bike in my office, he’d always make comments on how it takes dedication and drive and blah blah blah to ride a bike and because of that, I earned his respect and moved up the ladder.

There’s just something special about bike commuting that gets you noticed in a different light than butt kissing. Coworkers are always impressed that you would ride so far to work and that subject can be carried into meetings where other people discuss it as well as your job performance. Now bike commuting will not get you anywhere if your work is half assed. But I do know that bike commuting can help you become more productive and more alert with your duties at work and at home.

So if you want to move up the corporate ladder, try bike commuting.

DiNotte 200L LED Light review.

Noah from KC BikeCommuting has posted a review of the DiNotte 200L light.

During the morning and evening twilight hours, the DiNotte’s strobing patterns are extremely vivid and hard to ignore. I would almost call it annoying. Reflective street signs blink back at me, even with the sun in the sky. Now, even during the day, I don’t commute without the DiNotte flashing away.

Click Here to read his review at http://kc-bike.blogspot.com/.

Just Ask Jack — Overly Courteous Drivers?

Quinn sent in the following question:

“Commuters know about the ‘right hook’ — what about the opposite? By that I mean those drivers who creep behind you for a city block, when if they drove at speed they would clear the intersection before you got there. How do other commuters deal with them?”

This is another manifestation of the “overly courteous” driver. I’m sure many of us have been in similar situations…the driver hanging back instead of passing us, the driver waving us through at a four-way-stop intersection even though it is clearly their turn to proceed, etc.

What this stems from is that many motorists are blissfully unaware of the laws regarding bicycles on the roadway. In most (if not all) states, bicycles are considered vehicles, and have the same rights (and the same responsibilities) as motor vehicles such as cars. Or, if said motorist IS aware of the laws, they are just trying to be nice by being excessively cautious.

While these behaviors are not usually dangerous, they can be quite annoying.
Really, the best way to deal with these situations is with a smile — if you had time to talk with these motorists and to teach them the ins and outs of sharing the road with bicycles, that would be great, but folks rarely have that kind of time. It’s better to just heed that wave-through (giving a thank-you wave of your own) or deal with the creeper. I’ve heard of cyclists stooping over to retrieve a waterbottle, pretending to be so engrossed in getting a drink or looking around that the opposing motorist at that stop sign just gives up and goes through…but that technique has its own share of issues.

In short, be gracious, be thankful and above all, do it with a smile — facing an overly-courteous motorist is a million times better than facing a road rager!!

Have a cycling-related question? Just Ask Jack! Click on the link in the right-hand column to send me your questions.