Category: Commuter Bikes

Road Bike Action Magazine built their “Ultimate Commuter Bike”. Here are the main specs on their bike:
Sycip Java Boy Frame, SRAM force Grouppo, Conti Tires and FSA wheels. I’m guesstimating a couple of G’s for that bike. So I started thinking, what would be my ultimate commuter bike? Let’s see, my bike has to be comfortable, reliable, fast, nimble, a little stylish and not too expensive.

So here it is:

My KHS F20-R

What is your “Ultimate Commuter Bike”???

Trek recently released a new bike called the Soho. They have a few models in this line. It varies from geared to a flip flop single speed/fixie. It’s a sharp looking bike. The price tag is about $549.00.
trek soho fixed gear


Sizes 15, 17.5, 20, 22.5″
Frame Alpha Black Aluminum
Fork Cro-Moly w/lowrider mounts
Wheels Alloy flip flop high flange hubs; alloy rims
Tires Bontrager Race Lite, puncture resistant, 700x28c; 60 tpi
Shifters n/a
Front Derailleur n/a
Rear Derailleur n/a
Crank Bontrager Nebula 44T w/chainguard
Cassette Shimano 17T
Pedals Nylon body w/alloy cage
Saddle Bontrager Select City
Seat Post Bontrager Satellite Nebula
Handlebars Bontrager Urban Bullhorn, 25mm rise
Stem Bontrager Soho, 15 degree
Headset Aheadset Slimstak w/semi-cartridge bearings, sealed
Brakeset Alloy dual pivot w/Tektro alloy levers
Extras Chainguard

This bike is somewhat comparable to the Redline 925, but the 925 is only $499.

Which would you rather have?

I got an email from AJ of Pake Bikes telling me all about their new frame.

The new frame is actually called the C’Mute.
It has a versatile geometry which you can build into a
sport tourer, CX, fast commuter, geared or
single-speed bicycle

Cyclocross geometry
Butted Tange 4130 CrMo tubeset.
Rear rack and fender eyelets
Clearance for 35c tires with fenders.
Decals: Removable w/o stripping clearcoat
Semi-horizonal dropouts
Optional unicrown steel fork w/ rack and fender mounts
and low rider pannier mounts;
44mm rake, matching paint
Extended headtube
Color: Pave-Mint

27.2mm seatpost
1325mm rear hub spacing.
1-1/8″ headset size.
68mm BB shell
28.6mm front derailleur

SRP, frame with fork: $349.99


Either the parents of the kids at my daughter’s school are really dumb or these kids are simply don’t have a clue about the basics of riding a bike.

Number one basic is the use of helmets. Some kids straight out don’t wear them. Now that’s the kid’s fault but the responsibility of the parent to make sure they do. However, I also believe that the school needs to enforce it…after all it is a law.

Locking a bike seems to be optional at my daughter’s school. On any given day you’ll see nice mountain and BMX bikes not locked. If I really wanted to I could easily grab one and take it home.

Riding on the bike lane is another basic rule that kids don’t know about. I see a bunch of them riding on sidewalks and going the opposite direction.

Thinking back to when I was a kid, we had bike rodeos and usually a police officer would teach the kids the hand signals, rules of the road and the basics of bike riding. Either our government has taken money out of the schools systems which prevents teaching kids about bikes or their parents just don’t have a clue. At a certain point, as parents we can’t rely on the school systems to teach our kids about everything….heck they’re already learning about sex as part of “growth and development classes.” As parents, bike rider or not, if you are going to give your kid a bike, you need to learn about being a responsible bicyclist and you have the obligation to pass that on to your kids.

In my opinion, yes. Here’s a few reasons why. For starters when you ride your bike in or do any type of exercise, your body release all sorts of goodness into your brain to help you feel more at peace, invigorated and basically feel way better about yourself. This stuff is called endorphins and seratonin.

So with all that goodness being released into your body while riding your bike, think about the kind of attitude and productivity you’ll have once you sit down at your desk. I once had a job where I was hired on as a Marketing Associate. I then started commuting to work, 17 miles each way 2-3 times per week and then within a month, I was promoted to the Marketing Manager, and a month after that, Marketing Director.

Bike commuting helped me deal with my job in a different way. I remember when I would have to drive, I would already be tired as I pulled up to the parking lot and wasn’t as productive during the day. But if I rode, all the factors of the bike commute played into my better work habits. Not only did the cool air wake me up, but I was also getting a workout and I felt free. Bike commuting did quite a bit for my attitude and of course my health. I was just happier on the days that I rode.

When the CEO would see my bike in my office, he’d always make comments on how it takes dedication and drive and blah blah blah to ride a bike and because of that, I earned his respect and moved up the ladder.

There’s just something special about bike commuting that gets you noticed in a different light than butt kissing. Coworkers are always impressed that you would ride so far to work and that subject can be carried into meetings where other people discuss it as well as your job performance. Now bike commuting will not get you anywhere if your work is half assed. But I do know that bike commuting can help you become more productive and more alert with your duties at work and at home.

So if you want to move up the corporate ladder, try bike commuting.