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Fixed Gear

Fixed Gear Friday: KHS Flite 100 Review

The KHS Flite 100 is KHS’ offering for track racers and bike messengers. Here are the specs of the bike:

Frame: Reynolds 520 Double Butted full CrMo
Fork: CrMo track
Headset: Cane Creek A-Headset
Rims: Weimann SP17 Alloy, Doublewall, black
Hubs: Alloy Flip-Flop Track, black
Tires: Kenda Koncept 700x23c, Kevlar
Spokes: 14G Stainless 36°, black
Chain: KMC Z30
Crankset: FSA Vero Track, 165mm x 48T, black
Bottom Bracket: Sealed Cartridge
Cassette: Shimano Dura-Ace SS-7600, 16T
Pedals: Alloy road w/toe clips & straps
Seatpost: Alloy micro-adjust
Saddle: San Marco Ponza Lux
Handlebar: Alloy track bend, black
Stem: Alloy 3D Forged, black
Tape: Cork Tape, black
Brake Levers: Tektro alloy top mount, Front Only
Brakes: Alloy dual pivot, Front Only
Color:Flat Dark Gray
Frame Sizes: 50, 53(tested), 57, 60cm (measured center-to-center)

Weight as tested:20.05lbs

Here’s some info about me and my commute: I’m 5’7″, 160lbs and 37yrs young. My commute is 23.6 miles round trip and it is mostly flat. I ride from Whittier, CA to Downey CA in Los Angeles County. 90% of my commute is ridden on the street and the rest is on the San Gabriel River Trail Bike path.

Aesthetics:
The KHS Flite 100’s flat dark gray/black scheme reminds me of a Stealth Bomber; the bike is very unassuming, it has proper track dropbars instead of risers and there are no trendy Deep V rims here. KHS did add a little touch of ‘retro’ with its fork:

KHS also added a front brake to this year’s bike; you can also add a rear brake since the frame is drilled for one.


These cracks on the road help me determine the bike’s ride quality.

The ride:
The KHS Flite 100 is one fast machine: once you are up to speed, you can cruise at 19-20mph effortlessly; if you want to sprint, the Flite 100 feels stiff with no noticeable flex. The steel frame absorbs most of the road chatter; however, the 150 psi tires will make the ride uncomfortable. I usually inflated the tires to 100 psi and I had no issues. The San Marco Ponza Lux saddle is rather hard, but once I dialed it in, I got used to it. The Tektro front brake did a great job slowing the bike down in conjunction with my legs, being able to use your legs to control the speed of a bike is one of the great things of riding a fixed gear bike.

I found the 48X16 gear combination to be adequate for my commute, it does take the Flite 100 a little time to get up to speed, but when it does, it flies. The last half mile of my commute is a gradual incline, it does take a little bit of more effort to get up the road, but that is how your physical condition is improved by riding a fixie/singlespeed bike.

Things I would like to change:I complained about the lack of water bottle bosses, so I asked KHS why is it that they are missing. Their answer was that the KHS Flite 100 is a true track bike that it is used for competition and it is also mostly used by messengers that ride short distances. My solution was to add a handlebar water bottle mount which kind of ruined the look of the bike, but another alternative is to get a water bottle holder that clamps to the seat tube or the downtube. I also didn’t care for the pedals; I know that this is a personal preference, I just like the easiness of entry of clipless pedals.

Should you buy one?
Riding a fixed geared bike is an experience that I recommend trying, not because it is the cool thing to do, but because of how much your pedal technique and your physical condition improves. The MSRP of this bike is $549, which is pretty much the average. Although the bike is a great seller among track riders and messengers, I also think that this bike is a good medium distance, flat terrain machine. If you are looking for a decent Fixed Gear bicycle, check out the Flite 100, you won’t be disappointed.

For more information, go to www.khsbicycles.com

Fixed Gear Friday: Are ‘major’ brands not hip enough?

Editor’s Note:This post keeps receiving interesting comments so we decided to bring it ‘back to life’. Be sure to check the comments, there are times that comments are more interesting to read than the post itself.

The following post was written on August 25th, 2007.

I’ve noticed that Fixed gear bikes made by major bike companies such as Giant, Specialized or Trek don’t retain their value as much as a Bianchi, IRO or Swobo.

Giant Bowery
giant bowery

Specialized Langster
langster

Trek T1
Trek t1

Is it because it is not hip to ride a bike that’s from major bike companies?

Fixed Gear Friday: KHS Flite 100 Update

I’ve gathered a few observations from riding the KHS Flite 100 to/from work. But first, here are a few tidbits about my commute: I ride 21 miles round trip from Whittier, CA to Downey CA. 2 miles of my commute are on the San Gabriel River Trail, the rest is on the mean streets of LA. I’ve been riding the Flite 100 fixed gear style, my demo bike didn’t come with a freewheel.

The Good: The KHS Flite 100 is a nice looking, well made bike; the bike received a lot of positive comments at the Urban Bike Commuter Expo. The 520 Reynolds steel frame is light and smooth. The handling is quick and precise, the single front brake is more than sufficient to stop the bike (with the assistance of your ‘leg brakes’). The 48X16 gearing is adequate for my flat commute, it does take a little to get up to speed but when you are rolling, the pedaling momentum of riding a fixed gear bike is quite a joy.

The Bad:Not every bike is perfect, and I do have a some personal issues with the Flite 100. The first one is the lack of water bottle bosses, yeah this bike is directed to Track riders/Messengers, but for us who ride longer commutes, we need to hydrate.

The San Marco Ponza Lux saddle has this weird hump in the middle, that causes my ‘nads to go numb. I’m going to do some minor adjustments, but I’m thinking of switching it altogether.

Lastly, the KHS Flite 100 comes with 150 psi tires. They may be great for the smooth surface of a track, but for everyday street riding, they are harsh.

That’s it for now, the full review will be up in about a month.

First impression: KHS Flite 100

Our buddy Vince Calvillo was at the City of Angels ride in the exhibitor area and he told me that I could take any bike to test, so I came home with a KHS Flite 100.

I picked this fixed geared bike because it is very unassuming; no flashy wheels, no weird handlebars and it comes with a front brake.

I prepped the bike last night for today’s commute, I added a rear blinkie, a mirror and a handlebar water bottle holder. Yeah, I know, the water bottle holder looks kind of hacky, but I do get thirsty on my 21 mile commute.

It has been a while since I’ve ridden a fixed gear bike, but fortunately I got used to it right away… except for the pedals. The Flite 100 comes with pedals with toe clips and straps; I never liked them, so for tomorrow’s commute, the pedal duty belongs to my Crank Bros Quattro Sl.

Today’s commute was interrupted by a phone call from my daughter’s school, she was not feeling well so I had to turn around and ride back to go and pick her up. Since I was a little worried about her, I was not able to compile a lot of detailed observations on how the Flite 100 rides. All I can say is that the ride was rather smooth and fast.

I’ll be riding this bike to work primarily — come back for the updates.