Category: Gear

We’ve given you a couple days to guess what was in the box that came in the mail last week. Here it is, the On One “Fatty” fat bike:

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The bike we received is from On One’s/Planet X’s test fleet — the bike has been ridden hard since last July by a variety of testers, so it shows some wear. The specs for the 2014 model are as follows:

Frame: On-One Fatty Frame
Fork: On-One Fatty Fork
Front Derailleur: SRAM X5 Front Mech / 2×10 / Max 38T / High Direct Mount / Dual Pull
Rear Derailleur: Sram X5 Rear Mech / 10 Speed / Black / Medium
Shifters: Sram X5 Trigger Shifter 10 Speed
Chainset: SRAM X5 Chainset
Crank length: 175 mm
Chainrings: 36-22T
Bottom Bracket: Truvativ Howitzer 100mm shell Bottom Bracket, Chainline: 66 mm
Cassette: SRAM PG 1030 Cassette / 10 Speed / 11-36T
Chain: SRAM PC1031 10 Speed 114 Link Chain
Front Brake: Avid DB3 Hydraulic Disk Brake / Front / 900mm / 20 Post To IS / Black
Brake Rotor Front Avid Clean Sweep G2CS, Size: 180 mm,
Rear Brake: Avid DB3 Hydraulic Disk Brake / Rear / 1400mm / 20 Post To IS / Black
Brake Rotor Rear Avid Clean Sweep G2CS, Size: 160 mm
Handlebars: El Guapo Ancho Handlebars, Width: 810mm, Black or White
Bar tape: N/A
Grips: On-One Half Bob Lock-On Grips / Clear
Stem: On-One Hot Box Stem 70,80,90,100 mm
Headset: On-One Smoothie Mixer Tapered Headset 1 1/8 inch – 1.5 inch
Wheels: On-One Fatty Wheelset
Front Tyre: On-One Floater Fat Tyre 4.0 inch, 120 TPI, Folding, Black
Rear Tyre: On-One Floater Fat Tyre 4.0 inch, 120 TPI, Folding, Black
Inner Tube: On-One 26″ Fatty Fatbike TubeWidth: 2.5-2.7″ Heavy Duty
Saddle: On-One Bignose Evo Saddle / CroMo Rail
Seatpost: On-One Twelfty MTB Seatpost – 31.6mm
Mudflap compatible: No
Pannier rack compatible: No
Pedals: Available Separately
Bottle cage bosses: 1 set
Number of Gears: 20
Weight: 34lb – 15.4 kg

The specs are a bit different on the bike we received to test — a SRAM 1×10 drivetrain with a single ring up front and a chainguide replacing the front derailleur being the big standouts. Also, the test bike has Avid Elixir 1 hydraulic brakes rather than the DB3s on the current spec sheet.

As you can see from the photograph above, the snow started melting the day this bike was delivered to my door. So, we’re going to have to wish for some additional snow before we can do a lot of testing.

This bike is a bit of a departure for us…it’s not exactly a typical “commuter bike”, and there may be more useful bikes/bike setups for winter riding than a fat bike. But, we wanted to see for ourselves what all the fat-tired hype is about and share our experiences with you. Perhaps a fat bike like the Fatty here really IS the “must get to work no matter what the weather” platform we’ve been looking for?

Stay tuned for updates and the review itself over the next few weeks. In the meantime, I’m going to be out getting filthy and putting a big ol’ smile on my face. Frozen slush, anyone?

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Just before Interbike, the good folks at Bolle sent over a pair of their “Copperhead” sunglasses to try out. We’re big believers in protecting our eyes when we ride, whether it’s to the corner store or across town, so we jumped at the chance to check out a new pair.

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The Copperhead glasses come in a padded case with a microfiber cleaning cloth included. I got the “Shiny Black” color; the glasses come in five other color combinations. The frames are nylon with small hydrophilic rubber pads on the ends of the temples and at the nosepiece to prevent slipping when things get sweaty. The lenses themselves are polarized to help fight glare, and are coated with both anti-fog and anti-smudge treatments. The glasses themselves are suited for smaller faces, like my own — our pal Jim Katz, the PR man for Bolle, helped determine that these would fit my face better than some of Bolle’s other styles.

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As you can see, these are more of a casual style — lending them the ability to go with office attire as well as cycling togs. I found the temples to restrict my vision a bit, which may be an issue for those of you who prize extra peripheral vision while dodging traffic. The frames around the lenses are suited for riding more upright bikes; I also had obstruction issues when I rode my more aggressively-set-up road bikes. Hardcore roadies might be better served by rimless lenses.

Despite the minor issues with the frames getting in the way, the Copperhead glasses fit nicely, provided great coverage for my eyes, and stayed in place. No one wants to fuss with readjusting glasses on the go. The temples hugged close to my head, allowing me to tuck them under my helmet straps (decidedly “un-PRO”, but hey, I’m not fooling anybody).

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The lens clarity is great and the polarization really helps, especially when going from brightly-lit areas to more shaded parts of the road. And the glasses are pretty stylish — I didn’t feel like I was wearing sportswear; in other words, the glasses didn’t clash with my casual work clothes.

After I wore them for a bit, our friend Wesley (an alumnus of our mountain bike racing team) reached out to us — he was training with the U.S. Navy near Chicago and desperately needed a pair of sunglasses he could wear out on the water. Always one to support our troops, I got the glasses into Wes’s hands in short order with the request that he snap a photo wearing them in uniform:

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Wes reported that the glasses worked perfectly for him, and also looked pretty snappy with his “blueberries”. I wholeheartedly agree!

The Bolle Copperheads retail for around $99, and are available directly from Bolle or at retailers near you. If you’re looking for a casual pair of sunglasses that have performance features, but you’re not sitting on a fortune, these might do the trick nicely.

Please click here to read our review disclaimer as required by the Federal Trade Commission.

Surely you know that we’re big fans of fenders around here…they keep you and your bike happy and dry and clean, even in the worst weather. And, most commuters see them as a “must-have” accessory for a commuter bike. We couldn’t agree more.

Mir’s recent article about her quest for fenders got me to thinking about more fenders for my own fleet. I happen to have a few road bikes I sometimes use for commuting, and on rainy, yucky days I do NOT like to bring them out of the garage. Cleaning my shiny, sparkly road bikes is a chore I do not like. What if I could find full-coverage fenders for one of these skinny-tired roadsters?

First problem: the bike I wanted to add fenders to does not have eyelets on the fork or rear dropouts. Second, there’s not a lot of clearance to work with. Third, some of the other fenders suited for these kinds of situations aren’t full-coverage, and can be fiddly to install/maintain/stay in place while riding. I wasn’t about to have to deal with that, so off I went to the Intertubes to search out a solution.

Enter the SKS Raceblade Long. Full-coverage, easily removeable if needed, good reputation from a company that knows a thing or two about fenders. I took a trip to my friendly neighborhood Performance Bike to spend some holiday gift card money, and they gladly ordered me a set to add to my bike. About $60 and a couple days later, I was ready to install them.

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The SKS Raceblade Longs are made of chromoplastic, with stainless steel stays and hardware. They clip to small metal bridges that are mounted under the brake bolts and to metal tabs that are held in place by the wheels’ quick-release skewers. The concept is very similar to the legendary “River City Reacharound”, but there is no cutting of fenders required. Here are a couple shots of the clips and the way they mount to the brakes:

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Each fender is in two pieces; a longer rear section and a shorter front section. Each fender is supported by a double, adjustable stay set in stainless steel. SKS thoughtfully supplied soft plastic mudguards to screw onto the ends of the fenders:

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Installation is pretty simple: loosen the brake mounting bolts, slip the bridges in and tighten the bolts down. The bridges come in three lengths to fit most bikes. At the wheel, remove the conical springs from the QR skewers, and fit the mounting tabs underneath the skewers:

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The fenders clip directly to those bridges and tabs, and feature quick release buttons to remove them rapidly if desired:

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I installed the Raceblade Longs yesterday, and took them out for a test ride today. The ground is still damp from snowmelt and rain, so I could really see how clean they kept me and my bike. What’s the verdict? They work! No muddy stripe up my back or in my face, and my bottom bracket area is pretty clean.

The Raceblade Longs are not perfect, of course. Right at the brake bridge area, there’s a pretty sizeable gap in coverage (necessitated by the design and lack of clearance on modern road bikes). I found a lot of road spray and goop covering the brakes that will need to be hosed off periodically.

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The rear fender stops short behind the seat tube (again because of the design), so the back side of the bottom bracket shell gets a layer of road “deposits” on it:

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Also, the front stub of the front fender rattles like crazy on rough roads. It’s pretty annoying, and I will try to figure out some way to quiet it down, perhaps with a shim where the bridge enters the back of that stub.

Obligatory Mir.I.Am-style crappy cameraphone pic:
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Dings notwithstanding, I think these are a pretty good solution for people who want to ride their roadies in all weather conditions. They cover enough that maintenance and cleaning are reduced, and mount solidly enough for year-round use.

Please click here to read our review disclaimer as required by the Federal Trade Commission.

My fellow contributors were more than happy to let me take a crack at the funky Dual Action Seat #400 as my first equipment review.  When I pulled the funny looking Dual Action Seat out of its box, I thought, “this is definitely newbie hazing.” The aptly named seat has two independently moving butt flaps that rotate up and down as you pedal, and the whole thing swivels right to left with the movement of your hips. This is definitely unlike any bike seat I’ve encountered.

Dual Action Bike Seat

The Dual Action Seat is designed as an alternative for riders looking to relieve issues associated with the traditional horn-shape bike saddle. The roomy five-inch-wide seat pads are separated by a two-inch gap intended to reduce pressure on the tailbone and groin area, and the rotating action to limit hip pain. I read up on Dual Action’s website about perineal pressure, and dudes, penile paralysis associated with a traditional saddle is scary stuff!  If this seat helps minimize or eliminate damage to fella bike riders’ delicates, I don’t care how funny looking it is.

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I may not be the target user, but I do love a wide, cushy seat, so I was stoked to give the Dual Action a little, uh, action. Though the seat is geared toward touring or stationary bikes, with a few minor tweaks of an Allen wrench, it can be swapped in for any bike with a straight stem 7/8″ diameter seat post. Including my trusty steed, Roy the Roady.

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It was relatively easy to install. And by easy, I mean it is literally just adjusting two Allen bolts. A little too easy. I didn’t trust the simple directions included with the seat, so I managed to put it on backwards my first go.

DABS Instructions

The movement of the butt flappers seat pads is a bit strange at first and I spent a while finessing the proper installation angle.

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Roy with DABS

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Once I had Roy all geared up, I took him for a spin. The seat felt more precarious than I had anticipated. While the up-and-down movement of the pads felt natural with my pedal movements, the swivel action along the vertical axis was disconcerting. I felt like I was constantly falling off the seat. It didn’t help that I was slipping from the slick fabric of the seat itself—fyi, yoga pants and gel seat coverings don’t work well together (and I imagine a snazzy pair of spandex bike shorts might have the same issue).

Emily on DABS

The more I rode, the more comfortable I became with the seat’s movement; however, I just couldn’t shake the precarious feeling of the swivel motion. I felt like I was fighting the side-to-side motion, having to bring my hips back in line after each pedal rotation. Rather than enhancing my natural movements, I was having to work to stay on my seat. As for comfort, I wish the pads had been more naturally contoured—rounded or tapered toward the front. The squared edges tended to poke and rub uncomfortably for me. Also, the seat itself is heavy, adding weight to my fairly light road bike and making it more difficult to haul up and down stairs (which I have to do to board the train on my commute).

After putting in quality time with the Dual Action Seat on Roy, I realized it wouldn’t be a permanent seat swap for me, but I wanted to get a second opinion. So I mounted the seat on our office spin bike and persuaded my boss (yep, my boss), Jim to give it a try and let me know what he thought.

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An avid road cyclist and fellow bike commuter, Jim gave the Dual Action Seat a trial run. After getting accustomed to the seat’s movement, Jim had a similar discomfort with the swivel motion of the seat. He suggested that if the seat resisted or sprang back to neutral after each pedal stroke, the rider’s hips would still have the benefit of natural motion without strain of realigning the seat back to a centered position. Sounds clever to me. Overall, I think he’ll stick with his current saddle too.

I have no doubt that the Dual Action Seat design will continue to improve and serve as an alternative to the traditional bike saddle. While this inventive seat might not be right for me, if it can help riders keep riding without pain or medical complications, I am all for this wonky seat. And if you happen to be looking for a bike saddle to reduce pain while riding or said medical complications, you can purchase the D.A.S. Model #400 for $239.00 with free shipping. A bit pricey, but it does come with a 30-day money back guarantee.

Please click here to read our review disclaimer as required by the Federal Trade Commission.

Remember a couple months ago, we reviewed Pearly’s Possum Socks? Well, Duke from Pearly’s has some good news to share with everyone:

Pearly’s volume has grown significantly over the last 12 months and we are now getting far better prices on our raw materials…which allows us to lower the list price. So…I am really excited to share that Pearly’s now have a much lower list price of only $38 bucks a pair!! We are so stoked to be able to do this price reduction, I think it is going to open up the awesomeness of Pearly’s up to a much larger group of people.

That is huge news, indeed. I am sure a few people stayed away due to the high price of these wonderful socks, but now the lower price point means they’re much more affordable. Do yourself a favor this winter, and track down a pair of Pearly’s…your feet will be glad you did!

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