Category: Interbike 2008

We met with Mike and Eric of Banjo Brothers at Interbike. These two guys are some of the nicest guys in the bike Industry and are a pleasure to talk to. We’ve been fans of their Banjo Brothers line because of their durability and affordability. Their new line ofMinnehaha Bags promise to bring the same quality and durability that we are used to. Here are Mike and Eric describing some of their bags:

By the way, Banjo Brothers/Minnehaha bags have become a sponsor of our website. You can support our site by going to Banjo Brothers or Minnehaha bags and buy some of their stuff, it’s a win-win proposition!!!

As you have seen, we took hundreds of pictures, hours of video (more to come) and talked to dozens of people. This year we didn’t do a lot of posting during the show, we figure we do the meet and greet the first two days and roam on our own on the last day. Here are some of the stuff that I came across:

There were e-bikes galore, but the interesting thing was that most of the bikes I saw had the same electric kit. The bike below has the batteries inside the motor-hub, but when I tried to pick it up it was extremely heavy.

I asked a few people what they thought of the ‘electric evolution’, most of them agreed that e-bikes have their place in the bike market, but they will definitely not rule the world.

White is the new black. We saw white bikes galore, white handlebars, grips, saddles, etc. We were schooled by Mr. Wayne D. from KHS bicycles regarding which colors sell most. He told us that the safest bike colors to sell are black, blue and red. He also told us that Orange is the color to stay away from. (Sorry Russ).

Since we are ‘working media’, we were allowed to attend Lance Armstrong’s press conference. This was a treat for me since I am a fan (don’t hate me LeMond fans), the press conference became really interesting with LeMond being there.

More thoughts and experiences later on.

As we were walking around, the items of a little booth caught my eye:

A young fellow introduced himself and told me the story behind these bags. The bags are made of mostly recycled/natural materials. They use plastic from old banners and the fiber of a plant that is very similar to Agave to create these bags. He also told me that all the bags are hand made in Colombia by women who are the heads of the household, not children. The material happens to be the same stuff that coffee bean sacks are made out of, so it is very strong and durable.

Prices will be close to their synthetic counterparts, although these handmade bags are not on their site yet, you can check out other stuff they make at