Category: News

It’s coming up: the second annual Bicycle Bash By The Bay. It will be at the Vinoy Park in downtown St. Petersburg on November 4th. Here, just check out the flyer:

banner will be there with a table this year, and we’re getting some giveaway items (t-shirts, stickers, waterbottles) from our good friends KHS Bicycles. With a little luck, we’ll have a set or two of Sweetskinz tires to raffle off, too.

If you’re in the Tampa Bay area, come on by and say hello! There will be all sorts of bike-related vendors, and lots of yummy food from local eateries, BMX demos and bicycle collections to drool over. And, if you come to our table, you can lay eyes on the legendary “Patriot” bicycle in person! If you’re really nice and ask politely, I might even let visitors ride it…as long as I can snap a photo of you while you’re aboard!

The Patriot

We’d like to thank KHS Bicycles and Sweetskinz in advance for helping us have a presence at this event — and we appreciate your continued support.

So, everyone, come on by — it should be a blast!

I try to keep tabs with what goes on in the world, and more specifically, what bike commuters are doing around the world. There are days when I get really depressed – such as when a U.S. Congressman claims the bike as a “19th century solution to a 21st century problem…”- a story I am sure most of you have heard by now. But there are also lots of good news stories to be shared from legit, valuable sources.

Yesterday, the Freakonomics blog (a worthy read) posted a piece called “Will Bicycling to Work Get You Killed?” which acknowledges the growing popularity of bike commuting, and my favorite part, states “…the risks associated with cycling decrease dramatically when more cyclists are on the road, and especially when those cyclists obey traffic laws.” A message I feel is very important.

The crux of the piece on Freakonomics: based on a legit research project, per kilometer, cyclists are 12x more likely to be involved in a fatal accident than automobile drivers. BUT, pedestrians are 23x more likely to be involved in a fatal accident than automobile drivers. So the next time someone asks why you bike to work, you can say, “it’s much safer than walking.” There are other numbers that point to the benefits of cycling – but at this point I know I am preaching to the choir.

Another recent post on, used the same study and drew many of the same conclusions:

  • biking is safer than it used to be
  • biking is safer than you might think
  • biking’s health benefits massively outweigh it’s risks
  • biking is not as safe as it should be
  • making biking safer is a chance for healthy, lasting prosperity.

So hopefully these good stories – complete with statistics – will aid you in feeling more at ease in the saddle. Stats don’t mean a thing when you personally experience unsafe riding conditions – so be safe, be alert, but more importantly, be proud and be happy that you get to ride your bike to work!

The other day I went to the headquarters of in Long Beach, Ca. I met up with Andrea White, Executive Director of the organization. We chatted a bit about what Bike Station is all about and what they do. So to give you a better idea, I pulled this from their website.

Bikestation is a not-for-profit organization that offers secure bicycle parking and related services to make cyclists’ lives easier. Park your bike at Bikestation and you can be assured that your vehicle is secure and covered.

Whether you ride your bike to public transportation, to work, or you simply need a safe place to store your bike for the day, Bikestation is available to serve you. It’s simple, convenient and affordable.

Many Bikestations offer free parking during their hours of operation, and paid memberships for 24-hour access to secure parking. To find more information on what method of parking is more convenient for you, check the page of your local Bikestation for their daily hours of operation.

In addition, each Bikestation location provides unique services and amenities; but most Bikestations provide:

* Shared-use bicycle rentals;

* Access to public transportation;

* Convenient operating hours;

* Friendly and helpful staff;

* Information to plan your commute trips.

Some Bikestation locations offer bicycle repairs, bicycle and commute sales & accessories, rental bikes for local and tourist needs, restroom/changing rooms and access to environmentally-clean vehicle-sharing. Select your local Bikestation from the menu bar for specific services and programs.

After our meeting, I managed to walk down to an actual Bike Station in downtown Long Beach. It was only 2 blocks from their office so I grabbed my camera and got some pictures of the facility.

The Bike Station has a full-on bike shop that caters to commuters. Plus, the place is manned by mechanics who can work on your bike while you’re at work.

The facility sells commuter-specific gear such as reflective bands, fenders, wheels, tires, tubes, patch kits, fixed gear parts and much more.

Check out the bike racks.

Long Beach is pretty lucky to have Bike Station. Man I know so many people in various parts of the country who would do anything for a place like this. If you think about it, it’s like going into a bike shop, leaving your bike there while someone watches it…covered and secured…and when you get off work, you go grab it and ride back home! It’s such a great idea and Bike Station mentioned that they are in the process in adding more bike stations throughout the country.

If you’d like more information about Bike Station, just check out their website.

Floyd Landis will take the case to clear his name for illegal doping at the 200 Tour de France to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), the cyclist said on his website on Wednesday.

Landis, who has been stripped of his Tour de France title, will ask the Lausanne-based CAS to overturn the decision handed down on September 20 by a panel of three US arbitrators, who ruled 2-1 that Landis was guilty of using synthetic testosterone during his triumphant Tour campaign.

“We were surprised by the ruling when it came down,” said Landis’s lawyer Maurice Suh in an interview with Bicycling. “When we left that courtroom, it was our impression that USADA had not carried their burden of proof at all. We thought it would have been difficult for the arbitrators to find in favor of them.”

US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) officials and Landis’s attorneys gave evidence to the three-man arbitration panel over nine days in May during which time the US cycling star maintained his innocence despite testing positive for synthetic testosterone.

“Knowing that the accusations against me are simply wrong, and having risked all my energy and resources – including those of my family, friends and supporters – to show clearly that I won the 2006 Tour de France fair and square, I will continue to fight for what I know is right,” Landis said on an item posted on the FloydFairnessFund website, through which he has raised money for his defense.

Keep Reading

Good news for those of you living in NYC, a story from Transportation Alternatives:

Copenhagen-Style Bike Lane Coming to 9th Ave
Protected bike lane street design
With better bike lanes on the way, groups need to ask for more and expect the best from the DOT.
Click image to enlarge

On Manhattan’s Ninth Avenue from 23rd Street to 16th Street, the New York City Department of Transportation will soon build the city’s first Copenhagen-style bike lane.

The new “cycle-track” will be placed between a lane of parked cars and the sidewalk, affording cyclists of all ages and abilities a safe and comfortable ride, if only for a few blocks. T.A. looks forward to the expanded application of this type of traffic-protected bike lanes, a necessary step if cycling is to be a safe and attractive option for the majority of New Yorkers who are not comfortable riding in traffic.

The DOT also announced that an 8.1 mile network of new bike lanes will be installed throughout North Brooklyn connecting Greenpoint/Williamsburg with Clinton Hill, Fort Greene, Bedford Stuyvesant, Prospect Park and the rest of the Brooklyn bike network. And if that wasn’t enough, the bike lane on Fifth Avenue from 23rd Street to Washington Square Park will be upgraded to a buffered bike lane similar to the one that runs along Lafayette from Spring Street to 14th Street.

As the DOT raises the bar for its bike lane design and implementation, cyclists, community groups and advocates need to raise their expectations. In the coming months, T.A. will be urging the DOT to expand the application of traffic-protected lanes, and to adopt a “complete streets” policy that gives designated space to cyclists on all city streets. To make sure you see new bike lanes and better infrastructure in your neighborhood, contact your community board and the DOT.

This is obviously good news for those who will get to use this bike lane. But it is also good news for cyclists everywhere. This is the first step towards developing similar bike lanes in cities across the U.S. Every trend requires a trend setter, and I for one am optimistic that traffic-protected bike lanes can be a reality for so many more people. If not, I would move to Copenhagen before I move to NYC!