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DC Events: The National Bike Summit & Women’s Bike Forum March 3-5, 2014

Holla Bike Commuters: break out your cardigan sweaters and flat-heeled boots, cycle ladies, and for you DC cycle gents, maybe your oxfords and V-neck sweaters! It’s Capital bike time… For those of you in the DC area, come check out the National Bike Summit and the National Women’s Bicycling Forum March 3-5, 2014. I’ll be there, lurking, casually… and attending related free-events as much as possible!

Don’t be turned off by the storm, see you there!

Registration is closed online, but still available on site.

I’ll be weaseling my way into the 4pm event this afternoon. If you’re in the hood and looking for a last minute excuse to pedal power before the storm hits, join us!

WP_000057

Capital Bikeshare bikes at DuPont Circle

 

UNITED SPOKES: MOVING BEYOND GRIDLOCK

National Bike Summit 2014
March 3-5, 2014
Agenda

Printable Agenda Available Here 

 

Online registration is now closed. You can register on-site at the Renaissance Hotel in Washington, D.C., on March 3.

Sunday, March 2

4 – 7 p.m.

Media Training For Bicycle Advocates
Renaissance Hotel: Congressional B
Whether you’re showing off a new bike lane, drumming up support for federal bike funding, or calling attention to a safety hazard on your corner, you’ve got a story to tell about biking. Reporters want to help you tell that story — but you need to know how to work with them. Or, you can tell that story yourself! Join us for the first-ever National Bike Summit media training — hosted by the League of American Bicyclists, Streetsblog and Streetfilms — on Sunday, March 2, from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Renaissance DC (999 9th St NW). Read more and register.

7 – 9 p.m.

Streetsblog party! 
We love meeting our readers and bringing together our online community in real life. We’ll be hanging out post-media training at RFD (Regional Food & Drink) in the back bar. We’ll provide some yummy appetizers, and RFD’s full menu of entrees is available if you’ve worked up a serious appetite. RSVP hereRFD back bar, 810 7th St. NW (two blocks from the Summit hotel). $10 at the door gets you a free drink.

Happy birthday to the incomparable Mir.I.Am!

Oh, man, I’m gonna catch heat for this…seein’ as how Mir’s birthday was YESTERDAY.

In any case, please wish staff writer and Bikecommuters.com’s go-to humorist a very happy (and belated) birthday!

Here’s Mir jumping over a hotdog:

Mir
Yep, she’s THAT rad.

Please join us for a slice of virtual birthday cake, and raise a glass to Mir.

bike-cake

Get Outta My Bike Lane, Amsterdamnit!

Hey Bike Commuters. Do you ever find yourself cruising on your commute to work in the happily-allocated bike lanes, only to end up dodging weird obstacles and moving individuals peppered on scooters, rollerblades, shopping carts, or rolling dumpsters? I know I have… (Honolulu commuters: think Ala Wai canal bike lane towards downtown, knowhadImean?)

Scoot it, or boot it, scooter!

Well, in the flat bike-loving city of Amsterdam, it seems a similar battle has begun to unfold: Crotch-rocket scooter commuters are fighting for space in the bike lanes with, well, bicycles! How DARE they, you say? Check out this article from the perspective of a London-based bike commuter that was just released today on The Telegraph, called Battle in the Bike Lanes of Amsterdam.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/expat/expatlife/10634524/Battle-in-the-bike-lanes-of-Amsterdam.html

The author takes a look from both sides: one day, she and her partner rent a souped-up scooter and the next day a Dutch cruiser. Only to realize that it’s every commuter for themselves, lanes and lines be Amsterdamned!

The downside is that when you’re on a scooter all you can think about is how many cars you’ve already overtaken and when you’re on a bike all you can think when you see a scooter is “don’t be an idiot, don’t be an idiot, dontbeanidiot!”.

IMHO, there should be enough room for everybody on the streets: cars, bikes, scooters, pedestrians, and public transit. Can’t we all just get along?!

Eulogy for a broken bike

A few years ago, I penned a silly eulogy to a rear derailleur. One of my riding partners reminded me of that the other day when he forwarded the following article, written by the Mayor of London, Boris Johnson:

At first, I couldn’t believe it. No, I said when they told me of the death of my bike. Get away, I said; and then they made me look at the appalling wound, and it was only when I had run my fingers round the almost invisible injury that the news sank in. And then I felt like some relative coming to terms with the loss of a loved one.

Think of Alexander grieving for his favourite mount Bucephalus, or Wellington mourning the death of the great Copenhagen. After eight years of uncomplaining service, the venerable steed had charged his last. This was the bike that had taken me every day to distant parts of London, carried me into battle in two elections, heard my agony as I cursed up hills and listened in reassuring silence to my whispered rehearsals for the speech I would have to make when I arrived.

Read the rest of his eulogy by clicking here. I’ve got to say that Boris outdid me…his eulogy is eloquent and heartfelt. It’s worth a read!

Free bike registration program aims to safeguard San Francisco bikes

I was more than a little alarmed to read the statistics for stolen bikes in San Francisco. In 2012, one bike was stolen every three hours. Over 4,000 bikes were stolen in that year alone. And of the bikes that were recovered (about 850), less than 17% of bikes found their way back home. So many lonely bikes and wheel-less bikers!

safebike_sf-statistics

Thankfully a new and free bike registry — SAFE Bikes — aims to improve those numbers. According to a recent update from the SF Examiner, a San Francisco police advisory board and safe-streets advocates are launching the free registration program this month to help reunite bikers with stolen bikes. The SAFE Bikes program allows riders to register a bicycle’s serial number, make/model, and color into a secure database that’s connected to the police department. The owner will receive a unique and permanent ID tag to place on the frame. If a registered bike is ever stolen and recovered, SAFE will identify the bike and contact the owner.

SAFE Bike SF

A quick survey of some of my fellow San Francisco bike commuters (ok, a group of friends at a dinner party) reveals that not a-one has registered his or her bike. That goes for me, too. This particular group of riders use bikes as a main form of transportation around the city, and we’re not naive—we are well aware of the dangers, even of just leaving your beloved bike locked up in front of a bar while you run inside for a quick pint of Pliny the Younger.

When I asked my cycling cohorts why they had never registered their bikes, the most cited obstacles included “hassle,” “cost,” and the belief that registering a bike “wouldn’t make a difference.”

But I believe SAFE bikes will go a long way to overcome these registration issues. In fact, I’m leading the way––I’ve registered my bike. And it was easy!

Is your bike registered? If so, what program have you registered with? Does it provide you peace of mind?

Also, side note, SAFE has a great graphic showing the best method for locking up your bike. Check it out.