Category: Accessories

Have you ever had your shoelaces get caught in your chain, or wrapped around your pedal, or gotten chewed up by your cranks? I have…all three scenarios and a few more. Sure, there are a couple of creative shoe-tying techniques one could use to minimize such entanglements (or one could just get a chaincase), but accidents DO happen.

What to do? How do we keep our shoelaces protected from the ravages of our bicycles’ drivetrains? Enter Hickies, an elastic shoelacing system. The kind folks at Hickies graciously sent me a couple pairs to try out…one for me, and one for my school-age child to test.

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The Hickies are made of a stretchy and durable elastomer. They basically consist of a looped length with a plastic “head” on one end that the loop goes around. 14 come to each package…enough for a pair of shoes with seven lace eyelets. The packaging is neat (and recycleable!) and comes with clear instructions. Simply lace the Hickies through the shoe’s lace holes and pass the lopped portion around the head. Viola — instant slipons!

All laced up and ready to go:

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The Hickies work quite well — they are incredibly stretchy, so they accomodate a fairly wide range of shoe sizes. How the shoe fits after installing the Hickies, though, will be up to the shoes themselves and your feet. I have fairly narrow feet, and the Hickies were secure without binding. My son LOVES his…no more shoe-tying squabbles in the morning, and plenty of security for playgrounds and P.E. classes! As you can see from the photo below, if the Hickies prove to be too loose, you can try weaving them differently (all covered in the instructions and company website). In our case, the top runs were too loose, and crossing them as shown in this picture took up just enough slack to work:

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If they are too tight, though, there’s no way to lengthen them — I had to remove the topmost run on my shoes since they were too tight to allow my foot to enter the shoe. No worry…the shoes now fit like slippers, with even snugness the length of my foot. This was especially handy during plane trips, where I could slip in and out of my shoes at TSA checkpoints and on the planes themselves.

Over the past couple months, the Hickies have proven to be very durable…no breakages to note. If I had anything negative to say about the Hickies, it’s this: I had the topmost loop pop off the head of the device a couple times when pulling my shoe on. The Hickies sort of roll a bit as my foot slides in, and that was enough to pop them loose. If the groove that runs around the circumference of the Hickies head was a little deeper or wider, that may ensure retention.

Hickies come in a rainbow of colors to match nearly any shoe, and the heads are interchangeable so you can mix-and-match to your heart’s desire. Match your bike, your bag, your shirt, your shoes! The Hickies retail for $19.99 per package, and offer a fun and effective way to eliminate shoelace tangles.

Please take a look at the Hickies website for more details, instructive videos, and their creation story.

Please click here to read our review disclaimer as required by the Federal Trade Commission.

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And it’s a shiny blue/gun-metal gray color, oooOOooo, aaaAAAAaahh.

Hey bike commuters new and old, crunchy and green, or bright and shiny! For anyone out there who has had to change a flat on the go between work and home, check out this must-have flexible mini pump from Planet Bike: the Air Smith Mini Comp.

At the beginning of summer, RL hooked me up with a “welcome back to the U.S. of A.” Planet Bike care package including mad blinky lights and the Air Smith Comp. Now, although I am typically a fan of hitching a ride on the bus, walking my bike back towards my house, or flagging down strangers with a truck bed (don’t tell my Grandma) anytime I get a flat tire on my bike commute, sometimes you just gotta have a portable bike pump. A floor pump is usually my preference for any flat tire repair kit, but you can’t ride around town looking like this, now can you?

So, if you’re looking to add another staple to your commuter saddlebag/toolkit, check out the specs below on this clever stroke of PB genius:

Planet Bike Air Smith Mini Comp

  • Rotating valve head and hose makes it easy to use.
  • Retractable hose protects tire valve and allows for a powerful and comfortable pumping position.
  • Stow-a-way adaptor converts Air Smith to presta mode.
  • Using adaptor head with compressor is helpful if you have tubeless tires and need to reset the bead.
  • Stashes easily in a jersey pocket or backpack and mounts to your bike with included bracke
  • Composite handles
  • Includes mounting bracket

SKU #1037

$16.99

Those guys at PB have done it again. It may not seem like it, but that little flexi-hose at the nozzle makes this compact pump a must-have for commuting. “Why?” you ask, “Please, Mir, tell me it’s the bestest in the westest?!” Okay, I’ll tell you, but only because you asked so nicely…

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See that little shadow in the corner? Yeah that’s me. SPLADOW! Check out this rad mini-pump with flexi-nozzle action!

After you have given your flat tube a good 50-100 pumps (or 49-99 pumps), the flexibility of the hose allows you to spaz out as much as possible without accidentally disconnecting the nozzle from the presta/schrader valve. And let me tell you, am I some kind of spaz. Pumping up a flat tube enough to get me to my destination with this guy went from pain in the ass (translation: skitching with strangers would be preferable) to not so bad (translation: not worth a potential kidnapping).

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Anyway, not every roundabout comes with a tune-up station like this one in Asheville, so hold on to your pumps, bike commuters, you better have a flat tire solution on you at all times! It turned out, in the second to last week of our summer class, I got a nasty flat riding down the steep hill near my house. Since the bus in Asheville is less than rapid and nowhere near convenient, I hoofed it back up the hill, only to realize there was no floor pump in sight. Luckily, I had the Air Smith Mini Comp and a spare tube.

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Here is a pic I took when I changed the flat at home, pumped up the tube enough to get me down to the gas station and the 25 cent air compressor machine on my Asheville Bianchenstein.

The flexible nozzle would also be helpful if you just needed to pump up your tires if they were a little low. The rotating valve head also limits spaz-related disconnections mid-pump. And for its size, the Air Smith Mini Comp doesn’t wear you down to the point of annoyance, but is pretty reasonable for those of us who don’t carry CO2 cartridges at all times. The pump is lightweight yet durable, and, like many PB products, comes with a mount if you’re opposed to stashing it in your backpack.

As for the Bianchenstein, we made it down to the gas station for the air compressor with only minutes to spare and rode in to work on time.

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Hey, a cycle ladies gotta do what a cycle ladies gotta do… when she has a flat tire and no floor pump in the house in Asheville, NC. Thank you, Planet Bike, for getting my back tire back in business!

Overall: This bike pump is a must-have for any commuter toolkit. If you don’t wanna get stranded like Dave Matthews, for less than $17, get yourself a Planet Bike Air Smith Mini Comp and get back on the road! This pump will forever be in my backpack from now on.

 

 

There’s a lot of Eurobike coverage all over the web right now…tons of new bikes and parts being revealed in advance of our own Interbike visit in a few weeks.

Almost all the coverage I’ve seen has been racing-oriented — new race bikes, new racing kit, new racing components. What about us commuters? What’s new for us?

One thing that DID catch our eye, thanks to the good folks at Bike Biz, is a clever new way to deal with fancy work duds. Do you happen to work in an office where formal attire is required? Struggling to juggle your bike commute and your need to wear a suit? Enter the Freefold:

Presumably, the Freefold works on business suits/attire for men AND women.

There are a couple of kludgy bags on the market now that purport to make suit-carrying easy…and while they work adequately, this Freefold system seems very simple and VERY versatile (you can fit the folded assembly into any messenger bag, backpack, or pannier). This might be just the thing suit-wearers have been looking for!

We’re going to reach out to the Freefold people and see if we can run into them at Interbike. Who knows, we might be able to score a test version to show you.

Ok, it’s been a few weeks since we gave you our first look at the prescription Oakley sunglasses provided by ADS Sports Eyewear.

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As I mentioned earlier, the process to select a pair of prescription cycling sunglasses is easy — ADS walks you through the entire process, from selecting the frames, to entering your prescription. As many of you may know, ordering things online without the ability to try a product on can be daunting. Luckily, ADS offers a “Try Before You Buy” program, where they will send samples of the frames you choose before making the the prescription lenses. The only cost for that program is the return shipping (details available in the link above).

One thing that ADS does, unlike some other companies, is grind their own Oakley sunglasses lenses…even lenses that are outside Oakley’s own limits in terms of prescription strength. And ADS has some technology tricks up their sleeves; they use a couple of techniques to make the lenses clearer and thinner than a number of their competitors. They use a combination of free-form digital lens surfacing and lenticular free-form lens shaping (best explained by visiting ADS’s handy tech pages). I will say this: gone is the distortion and nauseating feeling I got from another pair of prescription wraparound sunglasses. The ADS iteration, with the free-form surfacing, means I have a much larger “sweet spot” that isn’t distorted in the corners and edges of my vision. This makes a HUGE difference to me.

I had my kids pick out the Oakley frame color and lens color from the many choices on the ADS site. Being children fascinated by bright colors, they chose white frames, blue earsocks and lurid violet “Iridium” lens coating. Alas, since these aren’t Oakley factory lenses, Iridium coatings were not available. Perhaps that’s a good thing; my fashion-sense is already somewhat impaired. I’m not sure I could pull off loud Bootsy Collins reflective coatings! On the plus side, my new glasses DO match my helmet:

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I was, however, able to get polarized lenses. Those lenses also make a giant difference in vision quality for me. Many of my rides go from bright sunlight to darkened wooded trails and back at the blink of any eye. Also, there’s a lot of shiny tarmac around this part of Ohio. Polarized lenses cut the sheen off the pavement and seemed to help with the transitions between light and dark as I rode. So, I felt as if I was able to ride with more confidence. An unanticipated benefit: I now have a sizeable advantage when I go fishing; I can see those little swimmers under the surface of the water with these polarized lenses!

As for the glasses themselves, they are Oakley’s usual high quality: stout frames, great slip-proof earsocks and nosepieces, and rock-solid hinges. The Half Jacket 2.0’s lens shape is, I feel, a substantial improvement over the previous version. There’s a little bit of extra coverage in the lower corners that keeps eye-watering winds to a minimum. The frameless lower portion of the lens is great for cyclists, as well…a nice unobstructed view of the road ahead while you are in a riding position.

ADS Sports Eyewear glasses aren’t cheap…prescription eyewear featuring name brand frames and lenses never are. In my case, the frames and lenses ran around $400. ADS does have some great warranties and “best price” guarantees, but what they really excel in is “value-added features”. They offer a huge selection of frames and coach the buyer through every step of the process…before, during, AND after purchase. I was rather blown away by their customer service; they answered a bunch of questions of a technical nature without me identifying myself as the reviewer, and they made sure I was satisfied with my prescription. They even offered to regrind the lenses if I had so much as a doubt they were incorrect (my lenses weren’t…right on the money the FIRST time). So, the whole package is worth the price of admission.

If you’re in the market for some sport-specific prescription (or even non-prescription) eyewear, ADS is a fantastic source. They have a huge selection and so many positive features that you’d be hard-pressed to find a better place to get outfitted. Swing on over to their website to get a feel for the wide variety of brands and colors they offer.

Please click here to read our review disclaimer as required by the Federal Trade Commission.

About a month ago, Michael from ADS Sports Eyewear contacted us to see if we’d like to try out a pair of prescription sunglasses. Seeing as I may have the worst eyesight of the entire staff, I happily volunteered.

I had an old pair of prescription sunglasses that I wore to drive (gasp!) a car, but never wore corrective lenses for cycling — except for my regular eyeglasses at night. Back in March, I finally bought an updated pair of “sport” sunglasses to ride and drive with, and was dismayed to discover that there was a lot of peripheral distortion in the lenses. ADS Eyewear claims to have solved that particular problem with their wide range of brands and styles, but we’ll get to that in the formal review later.

The process to select a pair of prescription cycling sunglasses is easy — ADS walks you through the entire process, from selecting the frames, to entering your prescription. As many of you may know, ordering things online without the ability to try a product on can be daunting. Luckily, ADS offers a “Try Before You Buy” program, where they will send samples of the frames you choose before making the the prescription lenses. The only cost for that program is the return shipping (details available in the link above).

I choose two pairs to try out, the Oakley Half Jacket 2.0, and the Adidas Adivista. I had tried a pair of non-prescription Half Jackets in the past and liked how they looked and felt, and was eager to try the newer model. I was unfamiliar with the Adidas pair, so was open to the idea of test-fitting them.

First, the Half-Jackets:

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Next, the Adidas Adivistas:

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After consulting with the folks who help me make the tough decisions (my wife and kids), it was unanimous: prescription Oakley sunglasses!

As I mentioned earlier, the ADS Eyewear site is chock-full of handholding resources — they describe their processes and policies clearly, and offer a pretty stunning array of options.

Stay tuned for the review of the prescription pair once I have had time to ride with them. In the meantime, swing on over to the ADS Eyewear site to check out their offerings.

Please click here to read our review disclaimer as required by the Federal Trade Commission.