Category: Lights

It has been a little over eight years since we wrote our non-scientific rear light comparo. Planet Bike’s Super Flash rear light was a top favorite and it is still one of my personal favorites.


We were offered to review the NiteRider Sentinel rear light featuring lasers. Yup, lasers! In top of the lasers, this light also features a 2 Watt LED light producing about 40 lumens. Let me tell you, even without the lasers, this light is freaking bright. Another cool feature is that the Sentinel is a USB rechargeable light-a huge plus in my book.


I’m guilty of purchasing those inexpensive Chinese laser rear lights and they eat batteries like crazy, not to mention that the quality of the lights was horrible. Lesson learned.


We used the NiteRider Sentinel during most of our weekly nightly off-road cycling ride. Our local ride offers a variation of horse trails, small streets and big avenues; a rear light is a must for safety reasons. The Sentinel performed with no hiccups even going through some bumpy trails.


The Sentinel was also tested during our morning rides to the beach on Pacific Coast Highway. Although the lasers were ineffective during daylight, the 2 watt LED was clearly noticeable.


USB rechargeable
Super bright 2 Watt LED light
Freaking Lasers!
Mount can adapt to most seatpost shapes and sizes
NiteRider Quality
Good run time
5 running modes

Lasers are invisible during daylight
A little pricey at $50.00

What I would change:
I think that the concept of having virtual laser bike lanes is a good one, however, I don’t really think that we need a laser on the right side since most of us ride close to the curb. It would also be a good idea if the left laser would be 3-feet away from the bike since a few states have a mandatory 3-feet passing law.


With its super bright 2 Watt LED, convenient mounting strapping system, USB charging and cool lasers; I can definitely see the NiteRider’s Sentinel being one of my favorite tail lights.
Our review disclaimer.

Oh Bikey friends and Internet stalkers (isn’t it funny to capitalize Ye Ole Internet?) – we have some grand news announcing an upcoming review of LED by Lite’s latest bike light system, Sol-48. Unbeknownst to you, dear (newbie) readers, Mir.I.Am reviewed the Sol-36 rig back in the day, which was a Wednesday by the way to test out version 1, which never officially “hit the shelves.”

Oh man, Brandon and Rick from LED by Lite have WAY better photos of their product at night than I do. Note to future Mir: Must pull over and try to get a bridge photo selfie that rivals this one!

Lucky for us, and you, we received a friendly email from Rick Smith:

Hello Bikecommuters,

You reviewed and commented on our LED By LITE Version 1 back in August 20, 2012. Your article and all the comments at the end hoped for our improvements and success.

We took the suggestions of our Version 1 users and incorporated them. We are now ready to release and begin sales of our Version 2 Sol-48 and would like to send you a set for your review.

If you are interested please email your address to me and a LED By LITE Sol-48 is on its way.


Rick Smith

If you are as excited about turn sigals for bikes as I am, let me get a secret fist pump under your desk or a jump-kick IOU, Bike Commuters. Because, here comes Version 2: the Sol-48!

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The Specky-Specs:



The LED By LITE bike light Systems include up to 48 state of the art, High Intensity LEDs to provide a cyclist with the most radiant 360 degree “to be seen” visibility. The LED bike lights are encased in  flexible polyurethane/silicone straps making them waterproof and extremely durable.

The LED bike lights are powered by our BlackBox², a 12 Volt double cell Lithium Ion Battery Pack, which produces intense lighting without sacrificing run time. The technology of the microchip circuitry includes “dimming pulsating” modes, not blinking on and off. The BlackBox² can be recharged with the wall adapter or from a computer using a micro USB cord.

The Plus of this system is our innovative LBL Wireless Dashboard.TM A wireless controller mounted on the handler bar controls both pulsation mode and directional turn indicator system. Your bicycle becomes a more relevant vehicle for the road.

QAD SystemTM is unique and allows for quickly attaching and detaching of the LBL LiteStrapsTM to help protect your lights from theft.

LBL modes of operation:

  • Hi Beam:  550 lumens run time of 7 hours
  • Low Beam: 275lumes  run time of 14 hours
  • Pulsation Mode:  Pulsating from 100% brilliance to 60% and back in one second
  • Day Mode: Pulsating rear lights only
  • Directional turn indicators

The system itself:

  • 2 white front and 2 red rear light strips
  • Lithium-ion rechargeable battery Dashboard: Wirelessly change between modes and toggle turn indicators. (4hr recharge)
  • Wire harness: Connects system together
  • QAD clips: Allows for quick attach and detaching of system in 30 seconds

*Using your arm is still considered a universal turning signal

That should keep everyone mildly curious for the REAL review to come, where I will lay down my Velvet Hammer of constructive criticism mixed with assinine accolades to give you, the readers and bike commuters, the real deal on this super-bright light system with turn (gah!) signals (gasp!).

In the meantime, let’s let this snowstorm blow through, so I can hop back on Brick the Bike with the LED by Lite rig, to be the envy the green bike lane in Somerville, seen from a mile away, blinking, turning, and salmoning up my little baby hill to my house. I can’t wait to really put this setup to the test! As Tyrese says in (can you guess the movie before clicking the link): “BRING THE RAIN.”


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My Somerville, MA year-round ride: Brick the Bike sportin’ the LED by Lite Sol-48!

Oh yeah, and for the record: here’s the FTC Disclaimer.

I thought I was doing just fine with my current bike light setup—yes, my front light is secured with electrical tape and it needs to be encouraged to turn on with a good smack or two. And yes, rear lights mysteriously disappear en route between my apartment and the office on a regular basis. Ok, who am I kidding, I need a new bike light system. Luckily for me, I’ve been tasked with testing out a couple different options. First up, Dorcy Hawkeye lights.

1-Dorcy Hawkeye Light

Dorcy doesn’t mess around with lights. The company’s products range from personal flashlights and headlamps to heavy duty spotlights and signal wands (for directing traffic). The Dorcy Hawkeye LED bike lights promise to pack a punch with the front light boasting 200 lumens, guaranteeing to light the path 200 meters down the road and to be seen from even further away—same goes for the rear light.

2-Dorcy lights in package

The Dorcy LED bike light  is not a dainty addition at nearly half a pound including three AA batteries. Even with the option of using rechargeable batteries, I’m not a big fan of battery powered devices, if only because I never seem to have extra batteries when I need them most.

3-Dorcy light out of the package

The battery cartridge has a satisfying barrel-like design, reminiscent of a revolver’s bullet chamber. Not sure why I like that so much, but I do. Though it doesn’t help the overall weight, which seems a bit hefty to me.

5. Dorcy light size

The light itself is much larger than most, nearly five inches long. But this is no ordinary bicycle light, my friends. Thanks to a patented quick release feature, the “durable aerospace-grade aluminum alloy, corrosion resistant” light chamber pops out of the bike clamp, transforming into a handheld flashlight. Snazzy.

With the rubber-padded bracket attachment, the light stayed secured to my handle bars with no obnoxious rattling (which is just the worst) or movement up and down. Dorcy claims that the bracket will fit any bike on the North American market, so I’m guessing this light will fit just as securely on nearly any bike.

4-Dorcy light on roy

The Dorcy Hawkeye features a wide-angle, rectangular light beam rather than a traditional focused beam, which helps to illuminate the entire road ahead while limiting (unnecessary) spread of light upwards. They also claim that this feature “will not blind pedestrians.” I tested this assertion by making my friend, Sarah stand still while I rode toward her, light blaring. Sarah still seemed to cringe way from the light, but once I rode closer, the beam did indeed remain below her eyes.


On to the rear light: the Dorcy Hawkeye Tail Light features three super high brightness LEDs that can be seen from 200 meters away. Like the front light, the rear light’s mounting clamp is tool-free and adjusts easily to fit snuggly on any 24 – 32 mm diameter seat post. Plus, the patented bracket adjusts for a horizontal or vertical orientation.

6-Dorcy rear light

Personally, I appreciated how the adjustable pin and padded clamp allowed me to really crank the bracket on for maximum security. No more losing a rear light on a packed train car or bumpy road! (Notice the velcro remains of a previous light still clinging to my seat post?)

7-Dorcy rear light mounted

For my first ride with these lights, I ventured out through Golden Gate Park to catch the sunset and make sure that it was good and dark for my return ride.

8-Dorcy Light Sunset

Both the rear and front lights have just two setting: steady beam and flashing. As promised, I felt like my lights could be seen from blocks and blocks away. Seriously, I was lighting up reflective street signs as far as I could see (maybe five or six blocks). Also, the front light has two slits on either side, allowing light to filter out and illuminate the area right and left of the rider. While this is a bonus for visibility, I found it to be distracting with the light shining in my eyes.

10-Dorcy light at the beach

For everyday commuting, the front light is a bit large and hefty for my tastes; on the other hand, I would definitely choose the Dorcy Hawkeye for my pre-sunrise rides through poorly lit backroads. Not only would I be well visible to traffic, but my path would also be lit clear as day.

The Dorcy Hawkeye LED Personal Light front bike light retails for $55.00 and can be purchased directly from—same goes for the LED Bicycle Tail Light, which retails for about $13.99.

Please click here to read our review disclaimer as required by the Federal Trade Commission.

Back in April the kind folks at Soul Cruzers sent us an LED bicycle wheel light kit. Basically it’s designed to light up your wheels by attaching a string of LED lights to your spokes.

soul cruzer LED lights

Their website states the following:

LED bicycle LED wheel light kit. Fits up to 2x 29″ wheels

Red-Blue-White-Green-Purple-Yellow -Pink

Comes with AA batteries, zip ties and EZ to follow instructions

Price $24.95 for a set, both wheels

When I opened up the package to install the lights, I noticed one of the light sets wasn’t working. From the looks of it, the batteries that came with it went bad. I went ahead and replaced them with a fresh set. Soul Cruzers does recommend replacing the “oem” battery with a higher quality like Duracell and the like. After installing the fresh batteries, the lights worked great.
soulcruzer LED lights review

The Soul Cruzer directions say that I need to loop the wire on every other spoke. The bike I installed the Soul Cruzer lights on was my daughter’s bike, the Nirve Ultra Liner.

Though their site states that the LED lights will fit a 29″ wheels, the Nirve Ultra Liner is equipped with 700c wheels and you can see from this photo, the wire doesn’t completely go all the way around. Does it really make a big difference? Well yes and no. If they say it will fit 29″(700c) wheels then you’d think the wire would be long enough, right? But when you light up the LEDs, can you really tell where the gap is?
Soul cruzer LED lights review

To answer the questions above, look at this photo. You can see a gap on the rear tire around the 5:30 position, the front wheel has a gap on the 3 O’clock position. Another thing I’ll mention, the rear wheel has fresh batteries, while the front has the OEM batteries. On a fresh set of batteries they stayed lit for 5 hours, while the OEM batteries started to go dim after 20 minutes of use.
Soul Cruzer LED light review

So how do the Soul Cruzers LED wheel lights look while spinning? Well, I gotta tell you, they do look great! It’s probably one of the better ways to get seen by cars because the bright colors help you be seen by anyone. From pedestrians to drivers, they’ll see you!
Soul Cruzer LED bicycle wheel lights
There were 2 things that didn’t like, for one, the length of the wire. It probably needed another 5-6″ to properly fit a 29er(700c) wheel. I figured Soul Cruzers had probably designed them to fit on the beach cruisers they sell, and those have 26″ wheels, so if you have a 26″ wheeled bike, they would be fine. Another thing was the OEM battery — they really should last longer than what they did. But if you plan on using these lights on a daily basis for your commute or for bar hopping, then I’d recommend using rechargeable batteries.

Other than those 2 things I mentioned, I have to say the Soul Cruzers LED Bicycle Wheel Lights are pretty fun to have on a bike! Oh I forgot to mention that they do have a blinker setting. So you can have one wheel run solid while the other blinks. I actually like the idea that the LED light isn’t just kept in one small container like traditional LED lights are, but these lights allow you to have lights on a larger scale. They would be great to supplement your front and rear LED lights to give you that added visibility.

Our FTC Review Disclaimer


Front and back views.

I’ve been running the Serfas Thunderbolt headlight and taillight for about 6 months now, and have used them on a variety of bikes and for a variety of applications.

These lights are USB-powered and use micro-LED strips rather than bulbs. Let me tell you – the LED strips are BRIGHT!! It hurts to look at them even obliquely. This is both a positive and a negative. It’s a positive because you get around 180 degrees of visibility from each light – way more than you typically get from either headlights or taillights, and it gives a degree of confidence that you can be seen from the side nearly as well as from the front or rear. The negative? Well, you can’t mount them quite everywhere you might want to without getting blinded! Despite the brightness, these are definitely more in the “be seen” than “see” category of lights – they don’t light up enough road/trail to function in that fashion, but that’s OK since it’s not what they were designed for. I liked using them in tandem with a brighter headlight, and mounting the Thunderbolt to my fork. However, I couldn’t do this with every bike, since on some of my bikes the structure of the fork meant that a decent bit of the light actually went back up into my eyes! Not really a fault of the light – but a note for those who might be thinking of using a light in that fashion!


Mounted on a road bike fork


Mounted on a seat stay

The lights are encased in a silicone rubber body with straps that allow quick attachment and detachment to/from just about any part of your bike. I initially thought they might not last very long, but so far the only thing that’s happened is that the (white) models I received are no longer white, and the little flap that covers the USB charge port is a little loose (not a big deal, since that bit sits pretty tightly against the bike frame/handlebar/etc). The flexibility of being able to put a light pretty much wherever I want is AWESOME. I don’t know why more light manufacturers don’t use this method. I’ve attached the lights to bars, forks, seat stays, racks, and a trailer. No problems with them staying anywhere! Once attached they stay put.


On a suspension fork!

According to Serfas, “burn” time is “1.75 hours (high beam); 7 hours (low beam); 3 hours (high blink); 9.5 hours (low blink).” My experience would indicate that these numbers are a little on the high side, but I can’t say for sure as I often wasn’t running them totally in a single mode for a single use (I definitely never used them on low blink for 9.5 hours). I DO know that the front has run out in under 1.5 hours of total use (two 45-minute trips in the dark, separated by about 2 hours). Similarly, I think the other modes run out in a bit less time than advertised. The only one where I’d say this is a true negative is with the high beam for the front. Most of the time, that’s the mode I want it in – and since I do ride for longer periods at night, it’s possible for my ride to last longer than the battery. I’d also say that for anyone who is not commuting to a destination where a friendly USB charger awaits, this might be a little short for longer there-and-back-in-the-dark commuting. However, it probably will cover 90% of potential users just fine.

The on/off button also functions as a mode switch (short hold to switch modes, long hold to turn off). Pretty standard commuter light function, and I never had any issues. The only (slight) beef I had with the switch is that it’s a little tough to manage in winter gloves – on multiple occasions I had to remove a glove to turn a light on. Those of you in warmer climes (or who are only fair-weather riders) won’t be bothered by this.


Mounted around/over the stem faceplate

TL;DR summary: the Serfas Thunderbolt lights are a solid set of be-seen lights that offer unparalleled side visibility and impressive brightness for their size. Run times may be on the shorter end, but the attach-anywhere flexibility brings the Thunderbolt solidly into the “good buy” category.


Mounted on a seatpost

Please click here to read our review disclaimer as required by the Federal Trade Commission.