Category: tires

A question I get a lot around here is “what is an appropriate and good tire choice to convert my mountain bike into a commuter?”

Back in the early 90s, there was a tremendous mountain bike boom — everyone wanted one , and now it seems that nearly everyone still has one hanging around in their garage. I’ve long believed that a mountain bike makes an ideal platform for a commuter bike in many respects, and I’ve written about that before. The frames are tough, the 26″ wheels are inherently strong and there are often good mounting points for racks, fenders and other crucial commuter accessories.

But, those knobby offroad tires have GOT to go — nothing soaks up your energy faster than wrestling against tires designed to grab hold of mud and loose sand and not lose traction. A simple swap to a more “road friendly” tire is a quick and relatively painless way to get things rolling faster!

Where do we begin, though? There is a bewildering array of tires on the market, and I’ve been unable to test the vast majority. I tend to buy whatever’s on sale that meets my criteria for a decent commuter tire: puncture resistance, minimal tread and a total width less than 1.5″. So, think of the following as a “roundup” of available tires from several major brands. These are not meant to be endorsements or recommendations; this article is merely intended to guide our readers toward appropriate types of tires for the road.

Strangely enough, there was an article in yesterday’s New York Times about good commuter tires. Check it out by clicking here.

Panaracer
panaracer

Panaracer’s Pasela, Pasela Tour Guard and T-Serv tires are perennial favorites — they feature good durability and great puncture resistance in a variety of diameters and widths. Visit their Urban tires webpage for more details.

Schwalbe
schwalbe

Schwalbe tires get a lot of good press — they were one of the first brands to offer a reflective sidewall, and their tires are legendary for style, durability and flat protection. Heck, they even make carbide-studded snow tires for winter commuting! Check out their complete line of tires on their road tire webpage…lots of styles, diameters and widths to choose from.

Specialized
Specialized

A heavy hitter in bicycling circles, Specialized has a pretty amazing assortment of tires to choose from. Their “Armadillo” and “Flak Jacket” puncture protection systems get rave reviews from riders. I seem to recall that the Armadillo models in 700c are quite popular with fixed-gear riders, as they offer a lot of durability for skid- and skip-stops. Check out their “widebody” and thinner 26″ tires on this page, and their road offerings on this page.

SweetskinZ
sweetskinz

Let’s not forget our friends at SweetskinZ, the innovators in printing a full-coverage pattern on tires, complete with reflective elements. These tend to be a “love ’em or hate ’em” choice for most riders. You either love the way they look or think they’re ghastly. I fall into the former camp, but then again, I’m not known for my fashion sense! SweetskinZ offers only one tread pattern for commuters. It is somewhat of a hybrid tread pattern with a center “file tread” section and short knobs on the outer perimeter of the contact patch. These tires excel on rough roads and offroad hardpack. They’re not particularly puncture-resistant, but I’ve not had any problems with flats. Check out their dizzying collection of colors at their website.

I think of my commuter bike as a “mission critical” device. Because of this, I insist on puncture-resistance in the form of a Kevlar or similar aramid belt, and I’m not averse to additional forms of flat protection. In fact, on my main rig (my Xtracycle), I’ve got Panaracer Hi-Road V tires with built-in puncture resistance, Mr. Tuffy tire liners AND pre-Slimed tubes. I am GETTING TO WORK ON TIME, DANG IT! Who cares that this combination is heavy, dead-feeling and probably overkill? As Moe said in an earlier article, once you’re pushing around 50+ lb. of bicycle weight, what’s a few more accessories?

Most of the big tire manufacturers, both the ones covered above and other companies like Continental and Kenda, offer plenty of choices in just about every size a bicyclist would need: 26″, 29″, 700c, 27″, etc. Good tires are a cheap investment that pays off in “peace of mind”. If any of you have particular recommendations for tires, please feel free to comment below.

Have a cycling-related question? Just Ask Jack! Click on the link in the right-hand column to send me your questions.

I always get questions about the tires installed on my Ibex X-ray Cyclocross commuter bike:


They are SweetSkinz Rattleback 700X37c tires. If you don’t know who SweetSkinz is, here’s a little bit about them:

SweetskinZ launched in 1999 with the goal of revolutionizing the tire industry. The company was originally conceived by combining a passion for cycling with a drive to design high-quality, personalized products — the first of which was the world’s premiere bicycle tire featuring a variety of full-color graphics and patterns that are also reflective.

Building on the success and interest from the cycling community, SweetskinZ is working to expand the SkinZ product line with a wide range of industry leaders. In conjunction with new SkinZ Application Partners, SweetskinZ is conducting research and development to bring designs to other products, including a variety of motor vehicle tires, apparel, footwear, golf cart tires and club grips, conveyor belts, and numerous industrial applications.

Our Goal? To not only produce the best quality products on the market, but to infuse a little style along the way so that both consumers and retailers can make a bold, unique statement.

SweetskinZ has evolved from a promising idea, to a company poised to revolutionize and revitalize industries.

OK, so back to the tires… I’ve been riding with these tires for over a year and logged over 700 miles on them.

Thumbs Up: The SweetSkinz rattleback tires have a rattlesnake diamondback pattern (thus the name), I like the design because it is one of their more ‘subtle’ designs, the design is more noticeable when the bike is parked and not when I’m riding it. The tires are meant to go on ‘comfort bikes’, but due to the high tire clearance of the X-ray, they fit rather nicely. How do they ride? The tires are low PSI so they are very plush and they roll with ease.The tires are also puncture resistant, I haven’t had one single puncture with these tires, Here’s what I consider being worth the price of the SweetSkinz tires, their reflectivity:


All SweetSkinz tires have reflective properties embedded on their patterns, a pretty cool safety feature.

Thumbs Down: Weight weenies need not apply, SweetskinZ tires are on the heavy side. Limited 700c sizes, 700X37c is the only available size, unless you have a bike with high tire clearance, tires will not fit. At $39 bucks a piece, tires are not on the cheap side.

BikeCommuters.com bikes on SweetSkinZ tires:



Recommendation: We love SweetSkinz tires for various reasons, yes, at $39 bucks a piece they are not cheap, but I believe they are worth it because of their durability, safety features and coolness factor.

SweetskinZ also supports our website by donating their tires for events like the Urban Bike Commuter Expo and the Bicycle Bash by the bay. We also get a small percentage of every sale if you click their banner and buy tires, all of this money goes for operational costs, not to make us rich.