Category: Web Resources

Here’s an interesting article that appeared in our Google News Feed the other day — from Fast Company, folks who know a thing or two about technology and new businesses:

Bicycles, with their gears and pedal power may seem like the Luddites of the transportation family, but the technology available to improve your ride is out there, it’s growing, and it’s helping more Americans consider bikes as a method of transportation than ever before.

If you’re a cyclist, or have friends who prefer two wheels to four, you are aware of how passionate people can be about bicycles, and specifically their enthusiasm for bike evangelism.

Tyler Doornbos, of Bike Friendly Goods in Grand Rapids, Michigan, chatted with me about some of the “barriers to entry” for getting more people on bikes, and how new technologies are addressing some of those issues. I’ve taken his advice and put together this short guide to digitizing your bike commute.

Read the full article by visiting the Fast Company page here. The article serves as a rundown of emerging new tech and devices to make your commute safer and easier. You may have heard of some of the technology already, but there were a few products in the article that were completely new to me, and I try to stay abreast of the trends in the industry. The article is worth a look, in any case.

Have you seen this? In yet another “it could only happen in Portland” story, an apartment development in that city is including 1200 bicycle parking spaces as part of the design:

inding a parking spot in most major cities is like playing a competitive sport: With too many cars vying for too few spaces, ruthlessness can often trample civility. But that may not be the case for one neighborhood in Portland—well, as long as the ride is a bicycle.

Currently under construction in the city’s Lloyd District, a cycle-centric apartment complex named Hassalo on Eighth has 1,200 bicycle parking spaces in its design. That’s believed to be more than any other apartment building in North America. The firm responsible, GBD Architects, is considering adding even more.

Bike Portland reports that each of the 657 apartments will be assigned at least one designated bicycle spot, leaving several hundred more that developers are confident will be in heavy use.

Read the full article by visiting the Take Part page.

A couple of news items and an associated report caught our attention this week — based on a study jointly conducted by advocacy groups PeopleForBikes and the Alliance for Biking and Walking, cities simply cannot afford to go without modern bike infrastructure:

It isn’t window dressing. Or a “hip cities” thing. Bike infrastructure — not the watered-down stuff, but high-quality bikeways that get more people on bikes — is becoming a must-have for cities around the U.S.

That’s according to a new report from Bikes Belong and the Alliance for Biking and Walking. Researchers at these groups interviewed 15 business leaders from around the country about what impact bike facilities are having on their bottom line.

Read the article covering the release (including important key points) by visiting the D.C. Streetsblog page, or download the PDF report directly by clicking here. Although the report focuses its attention on protected, separated bike lanes, there are important lessons here for city planners and politicians to learn.

In any case, it’s an interesting and eye-opening read…but what I liked hearing from the report is that people who use a bike to get to and from work are smarter, healthier, and more creative. No surprises there, of course — we’re smarter and better-looking on two wheels than the average car-bound citizen!

The following article popped up in our news feed and on our Facebook page over the weekend — a Salon article interviewing bike activist and author Elly Blue on her new book Bikenomics:

It’s hard to deny that bicycles are having a moment. Last year saw New York City, Chicago, Salt Lake City and Columbus all get bike-share systems of their very own — joining Boston, London, Paris, Dublin, Moscow, Hangzhou, Montreal and many, many other cities throughout the world. Increasingly, people are talking about bikes as a replacement for cars (and even trucks), debating the best ways to design bike lanes and bike-friendly intersections, dreaming up futuristic bike paths and, above all else, taking to the streets on two wheels.

But bicycling’s recent rise to the spotlight isn’t just a passing fad, argues writer and bike activist Elly Blue. Instead, she says, growing numbers of people are beginning to recognize the tangible benefits — to themselves and to their cities — of trading in cars for self-powered transportation. And the research is backing up their experiences. Blue’s new book, “Bikenomics,” draws on a growing body of academic work, along with her own involvement with the country’s bicycle movement, to make the economic case for bicycles. As for the people who insist, in the face of such evidence, that bike commuters are a scourge on humanity? Blue maintains they’re just bitter from spending so much time stuck in traffic.

Read the rest of the article by clicking here.

I hope she’s right, that using a bike for transportation will be old news within five years…What do YOU think? Are we finally in a new “Golden Age” of bicycling? Is the pro-bicycling momentum finally self-sustaining to where more and more cities will jump onboard with infrastructure and the like? We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below.

Most of us have met commuters who need to dress a bit more formally around the office, and must carry their dressier clothing via pannier or Monday-morning car delivery. While there are a variety of ways to bring a suit to work, sometimes the best solution is to just wear it. After all, in other places like Copenhagen and Amsterdam, cyclists don’t really see a need to get dressed for the ride in anything that isn’t regular work clothing. It works for them, and it can work for us.

Enter Parker Dusseau, a men’s clothier based in San Francisco. They’re making a “commuter suit” with a lot of details bicyclists can really get behind.

commuter_suit

The suit checks a lot of boxes…performance fabrics, deep pockets, hidden reflective trim, pit zippers, etc. Best of all, it LOOKS like a suit. Too much “commuter clothing” turns out to be fancified jeans or other attire not suitable for a more formal work environment.

suit_commute

The Parker Dusseau pieces are available separately, and there are corresponding shirts and even chinos for less formal affairs. More information available at Cool Hunting or by visiting the Parker Dusseau information page.