BikeCommuters.com

Women Bike

Commuter Profile: Sarah Eberhardt

Oooh Cycle Ladies and Gents – please give a round of applause for our latest Commuter Profile starlette – hot, strong, and ready to bike down the red carpet… SARAH EBERHARDT hailing from Los Angeles, California!

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Sarah Eberhardt commutes in downtown L.A.

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Sarah bikes to LIVE, here she is in San Diego, CA.

Name: Sarah Eberhardt

How long have you been a bike commuter?

Since 2005- the inception of my cycling life as we know it! 1/4 of my life I have been commuting via bike! Yeah! =)

Why did you start riding your bike to work and how long is your commute?

Let’s rephrase the Q – I bike to live and know that 2 miles is my ideal commute. I drew a 2 miles radius around my workplace, and chose where to live that was precisely 2 miles away from work. Any more than that, I’d get lazy some days (come on – who doesn’t find an excuse to drive their car if they have one?); any less, it wouldn’t be enough cardio to jump start my day.

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Sarah with the baby blue Fuji Bordeaux, prior to thieving thievery... in Taos, NM.

How does Bike Commuting help you with your lifestyle (economics, health, relationships)?

How does bike commuting NOT help my lifestyle? I could go on for days, but bike commuting was the primary purpose of my move to Los Angeles – where all conditions align for the epitome of bike commuting environments – sunshine 364 days a year, no rain, no flash storms, acute temperature deviations from 70 degrees, mildly conscious drivers – all giving me a daily commute unlike the norm in Los Angeles.

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Definitely all smiles in Downtown LA, I love it!

I have a smile on my face every day I am going to work. My commute time is not based on traffic pattern surprises or sudden road closures – it is 12 minutes each way, plus or minus one minute for red lights. I save gas money. I save parking fees. I save parking hunt headache in downtown LA.

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Hmmm, this one doesn't look like commuting in Copenhagen... must be mountain biking the Rio Grande in Taos, NM!

What do you do for a living and in what city do you bike commute?

Architect by degree and banquet server by recession, I bike commute daily within downtown Los Angeles. I have owned a bike and commuted while living months at a time in Cleveland, OH; Cincinnati, OH; Copenhagen, Denmark; Berkeley, CA; and Taos, NM.

What kind(s) of bike do you have?

I’m on my 3rd road bike since 2005 and her name is Igriega (because it sounds like “egret” and it is my favorite Spanish word – she makes me fly past the egrets that wade in the LA River along many of my weekend warrior rides). She is a solid carbon fiber Trek Madone and the bike of my dreams. She soars me through the heavy clouds (cough cough *smog*) of LA.

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Thugs for Life, Bikes for Life - laying down with her black Bianchi in Cincinnati, OH.

Prior to her, my virgin roadie was an aluminum baby blue Fuji Bordeaux- stolen on Berkeley’s campus (NEVER USE CABLE LOCKS!!). My interim roadie was a steel black and teal Bianchi Imola – the thug bike – I suspect it was a stolen bike (even though I checked it with stolenbicycleregistry.com) and again, was stolen off the trunk rack of my car in Koreatown LA. That bike had bad bike karma – it was destined to be passed from thief to rider to thief to rider.

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Using the Iron Horse MTB for a leisure MTB ride on Catalina Island off coast of Cali

I also own a less momentous Iron Horse mountain bike for non-road friendly treks.

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"What the hell?!" - Mir.I.Am's reaction.

Any funny or interesting commuting story that you may want to share?

While living in New Mexico, I once carried home a 3 foot diameter tumbleweed on my back that I found to use as décor. It is a lot harder to bike one-handed with a large prickly odd-shaped object strewn over your shoulder!

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Response from Sarah, "Tumbleweed in Taos, NM!" Obviously.

What do people (coworkers, friends) say when you tell them that you are a bike commuter?

“Oh my, is that safe?” “Do you even bike at night?”

If you’re surrounded in steel, it’s not necessarily safer than riding on top of steel. So yes, it is as safe as driving in a car, and yes I use bike lights.

How about bicycling advocacy? Are you active in any local or regional advocacy groups?

No.

Anything else that you want to share with us?

YES, I’m renowned for a series of jumping photos in epic places — some of these places I was lucky enough to have had my bike along for the journey.

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Jump photo time on the LA River trail.

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Coronado Island in San Diego, leisure ride with Sarah's man Valentin for weekend warrior adventures.

Sarah, thanks for sharing your fun-fun photogs and awesome sauce profile with us.  You’ve reaffirmed my personal belief that women on bikes are just plain hot!  Want to show us your ride and tell us all about it, lovely Bike Commuters?  Then send an email and we’ll hook you up with a Commuter Profile questionnaire!  Email mir[at]bikecommuters[dot]com for details.

Women Bike

The first-ever National Women’s Bicycling Summit is wrapping up today in Long Beach, CA.

Unfortunately I couldn’t make it to this year’s Summit, but I cheer the movement and look forward to the outcome.

This first-ever event is co-hosted by the League of American Bicyclists and the Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals, in partnership with Women on Bikes SoCal and Pro Walk Pro Bike.

The Summit will provide a unique opportunity to network, share best practices and develop action steps to get more women in your community out riding. It will provide the space for us to create a bike future where women of all backgrounds are equally represented on the streets and in the movement!

And now…on the heels of this Women’s Cycling Summit, the League of American Bicyclists announces the formation of a new initiative “geared” at women: Women Bike.

For Immediate Release

Contact:
Carolyn Szczepanski
Communications Director
League of American Bicyclists
(202) 355-3048
Carolyn@BikeLeague.org

Women Bike Aims For Equity in the Bicycle Movement
League launches new program to encourage, engage and elevate women bicyclists
Long Beach, Calif. – September 13, 2012 – Twenty-four percent is not good enough.

In 2009, women took just 24 percent of bicycle trips in the United States — and it’s easy to see why. In communities across the nation, women are underrepresented in all aspects of the bicycle movement — from retail to politics, from advocacy to engineering. It’s time to encourage, engage and elevate more women bicyclists in the United States.

Today, at the National Women’s Bicycling Summit, the League of American Bicyclists launched a new initiative: Women Bike.

Women Bike will empower more women to bicycle and become engaged in the diverse leadership opportunities of the bicycle movement — as advocates, engineers, retailers, manufacturers and policy makers — through networking, knowledge sharing, resources and inspiration.

“Equity matters — in bicycling as everywhere,” said Elizabeth Kiker, Executive Vice President of the League of American Bicyclists. “The League’s Women Bike program will work to ensure that the conversation of how to transform America for cycling includes women.”

“After 20 years of being involved in bicycling and watching how women integrate bicycling into their lives, it is a fabulous time to see the emergence of Women Bike,” said Gail Spann, League board member. “The timing couldn’t be more right!”

Evident from the 250 attendees at the Women’s Summit, the energy and momentum around women bicycling is growing nationwide. To support and accelerate that rise, advocates need the opportunity to share collective knowledge, build a network of female leaders and advance targeted programs that put more women in the saddle — and at the forefront of the movement.
* Women Bike will bring together women cyclists at key meetings like the National Bike Summit and Interbike.
* Women Bike will encourage, educate and demonstrate how women can take leadership roles in bicycle advocacy.
* Women Bike will help women become bicycle educators and thought leaders in their communities.

Our vision: By 2025, American women will ride their bikes at the same rates as American men for transportation, recreation and fitness.

To provide insight and direction Women Bike will be guided by the input of bicyclists around the country and an advisory board of women leaders in bicycle advocacy, media, manufacturing, and engineering, including:
Pasqualina Azzarello, Recycle-A-Bicycle
Melissa Balmer, Women on Bikes SoCal
Elly Blue, Taking the Lane
Veronica Davis, Black Women Bike DC
Alexis Lantz, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health
Katie Mulvey, Jamis Bicycles
Fionnuala Quinn, Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals
Tiara Ranney, Trek Women
Caroline Samponaro, Transportation Alternatives
Gail Spann, League of American Bicyclists
Elysa Walk, Giant Bicycle
Corinne Winter, League of American Bicyclists, Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition
Susi Wunsch, Velojoy.com

Women and men in all aspects of the bicycle movement are invited to get involved. Learn more and sign up for e-mail updates at www.womenbike.org.

As a woman who bikes and who is already involved with bike advocacy and education, I welcome the support of the bike community. I know plenty of women currently making wonderful contributions to the bike world and I look forward to seeing more female influences.