This is a public service announcement for all Irvine/Tustin California drivers.

I know that it has probably been years since you got your driver’s license but let us turn to page 39 of the California Driver Handbook. Now let us focus on the “Bicycle Lane section”:

A bicycle lane is a designated traffic lane for bicyclists, marked by a solid white line, typically breaking into a dotted line ending before it reaches the corner. Different from a simple white line showing the edge of the road, a bicycle lane follows specific width requirements and is clearly marked as a bike lane.

Treat a bicycle lane the same as other traffic lanes.
Do not turn into the lane if there is a bicyclist in the bike lane.
Do not obstruct bicycle traffic by reducing the width required for safe bicycle passage, typically 3 to 4 feet.

When you are making a right turn within 200 feet of the corner or other driveway entrance, you must enter the bicycle lane only after ensuring there is no bicycle traffic, and then make the turn. Do not drive in the bicycle lane at any other time.

Not one, but three times were drivers driving on the bike lane while I was in it!

Irvine/Tustin drivers, I know you are probably in a hurry to get somewhere, but let’s look at a video that I took from my last commute:

Notice the wrong way and the correct way of merging into a bike lane and making a right turn, there is no need to buzz by me and merge into the bike lane when you have over 200 feet to go.

Thank you.

Welcome back to The Bike Geek’s weekly post, I hope all you dads had a great father’s day. Although my father’s day weekend did not involve any cycling, I ended up doing some work on the Spicer Cycles Cyclocross bike.


The work involved swapping a handlebar, installing new brake cables and housing, new Avid Shorty 4 brakes and new bar tape. Now, I really like my LBS but when they charge about $10 to install new bar tape and about $40 to install the brakes, I rather do it myself.


Most of the work you can do it yourself with basic “household” tools but investing in a couple of bicycle specific tools is totally worth it. One of these tools is the Park Tools CN-10C Cable cutter, at about $34 is not cheap but this tool gets a lot of use.


Another must have tool is a decent floor pump with a gauge, riding a bike at 50% PSI is not only prone to flats but is also inefficient. My choice of pump is a Planet Bike ALX floor pump, I’ve had this pump for over 5 years with zero problems.


I won’t bore you with DIY videos, simply search YouTube for any type of repair and you will find quite a bit of information. Besides saving yourself money for beer or coffee, another benefit of working on your bike is that you get to know your bike quite well and you will be ready for any emergency road repair.

So now that I can actually stop (the brakes were horribly stuck on the Spicer CX), it is time to take the train again and take the CX on the dirt trails too!

Hello fellow bicycle riders! I know it is late but I had a fun filled weekend hiking and riding my mountain bike that I did not have a chance to ride my Spicer Cycles CX bike until today.


If you visit our Facebook page, you noticed that I posted a picture of something resembling an X-men belt, it is actually the Abus Bordo Granit X plus 6500 (say that three times fast) lock.


I had the chance to ride to the post office for a quick errand so I decided to take the lock with me for a first impression. This lock is like nothing I’ve ever seen, it folds tidily into a pouch that features a very versatile strapping system.


Notice I was able to strap the lock to my Axiom Streamliner DX rear rack which helped counter balance my 2 Wheel Gear pannier backpack convertible. You can also attach it in lieu of a water bottle cage, but I’m a thirsty guy so I need both cages on my CX.

The Abus Bordo Granit X plus 6500 is a little heavy, weighing at about 3.88 lbs but unless you are carrying it in your backpack, the weight is not too noticeable.


The lock features 5.5mm steel bar made of special hardened steel and Soft-touch coating on the bars and matching silicone lock body cover protects bike’s paint job. Just be careful with the links because they can pinch you.


As I arrived at my post office, I immediately parked my bicycle with the tire inside the rack. Well, the lock was not long enough to lock the front tire and the frame so I decided to lock my bike to the side of the rack. Mmmm, not too happy about that.


Since I was only going to go inside the post office for a couple of minutes, I felt OK leaving my bike locked as the pictures show, but no way I would leave my bike locked like that for an extended period of time. Why? I think my wheels are an essential part of my bike and since they feature quick release skewers, they would be easy to steal.


The lock also comes with a key that has a little blue LED so you can find the hole in the dark, I think that it is a nice little feature.

The Abus Bordo Granit X plus 6500 is sort of like a flexible U-lock, but bulkier, and heavier and the price…. $179.00 which is over twice as much as a Kryptonite lock. I also did not find any guarantee if your bike gets stolen while using this lock, that is a bummer for a lock of this price point.

We will try to break this lock using rudimentary tools, will it hold up? We will see soon….

I just realized that I’ve been doing my weekly posts for almost 4 months without my smart ass getting fired from I reckon that is a good thing… Anyhow, I’ve been having fun writing all these posts since I got my bike mojo back and I have been lucky to have been given the chance to review some cool things.


A couple of weeks ago I wrote a post about how I like to look at Craigslist for good deals and sure enough, I found a deal that I just could not resist. As you can see from the picture above, I got this Spicer Cyclocross from Craigslist for $200, yup, $200!!!. Unfortunately that meant that I had to get rid of one bicycle because I’m a condominium dweller with no garage so we say good bye to my very trusty Devinci Caribou 2.


Luckily the Devinci Caribou 2 will stay in the family since its new riding partner is our beloved Editor-in-Chief RL Policar. Let’s not get mushy about the Caribou because this Spicer bike is really exciting and intriguing. I’ve never heard of Spicer Cycles so a Google search revealed that this company is an American company that creates handmade frames; mainly fixed gear and pursuit frames with the occasional mountain bike, cyclocross bike and road bike. The Spicer website does not have much about them and their history and unfortunately the seller did not have much information about the bike other than “my ex-husband bought it for me”.


My new-to-me Spicer Cycles Cyclocross comes with a mix of interesting components:

Campy Chorus shifters and derailleurs


Alex Rims, Vuelta cranks, Michelin Cx Tires and a carbon fiber fork. Not bad for $200.


Notice that I already added some of my favorite bicycle commuter accessories such as the top tube bag, handlebar mirror, dual matching bottle cages, Crank Brothers eggbeater pedals, frame pump and a rear blinkie. What is missing? The rear rack! This Spicer cyclocross bike comes with no holes for a rear rack so I ended up ordering an Axiom Streamliner Road DLX rear rack for bicycles with no mounting holes.



The rack uses the wheel skewer to secure the rack and a securing bridge that attaches to the fender hole.


I had to improvise on securing the bridge mount with zip ties, but this means that I can still commute with my favorite Pannier/Backpack convertible from 2 Wheel Gear.

Come back for the exciting adventures that awaits and for a full review of the Axiom Streamliner DLX rear rack.

Spain is a destination endlessly popular with cyclists. Its excellent climate, beautiful natural landscapes, and bike-friendly cities make it the perfect holiday location for travel hungry cycling nuts all around the world. For a truly special two-wheeled tour, though, head to the south east of Spain and the hip, hot and happening coastal regions of Valencia, Murcia and Andalusia.

And don’t worry: with some careful planning, you won’t have to go through the rigmarole of hiring once you’re there. Pack smart and you can take your own bike with you on your epic Spanish odyssey.

Picture by Martin Cox on Flickr, some rights reserved

Packing your Bike for a Flight

First things first: read the small print. Even if an airline is offering cheap flights, they may charge you a high fee to check your bike, so it’s worth shopping around for the best deals. Though it can be tempting to box up your bike and claim it’s just a regular old piece of luggage, this will prevent you from claiming any insurance if the bike is damaged during transit.

As for the actual packaging, it comes down to three options. Firstly, you could choose a soft bike case or plastic bag. Bags are cheap and flexible but don’t offer much protection from overenthusiastic baggage handlers.

Secondly, you could invest in a sturdy rigid case. This will definitely keep your bike safe, but is also the most expensive option and difficult to transport once you’re off the plane.

Your third option is a cardboard box, which strikes a happy medium between the other two, giving adequate protection to your bike without being too expensive. Best of all, you can maintain your green credentials by recycling it once you get to your destination!

City Biking

Some of the best cycling to be found in this part of the world is in Murcia. This university city boasts numerous cycling trails and fascinating sights in the centre of town, including an ornate cathedral, a large botanical garden and park, and a spectacular world-famous casino in the Sociedad Casino of Murcia.

Further south from Murcia, the coastal cities of Almeria and Cartagena provide ample opportunities for cycling. The notoriously dry Almeria is particularly pleasant for tranquil bike rides during the cooler autumn months. Meanwhile, Cartagena is the place to be if you’re into your historic architecture. The city is home to an ancient Roman theatre, the ruins of a cathedral destroyed in the Spanish Civil War, and a number of striking Art Nouveau buildings.

Cycling Disused Railway Tracks

Around the south east of Spain, there are numerous disused railway tracks, which have been converted into cycling paths. Known as “greenways” or via verdes to the locals, these paths are a secluded and truly unique way of travelling through Spain’s natural landscapes.

If you’re headed for Valencia, take a train down to Gandia and hop on the Safor Greenway, a long straight cycling path that takes you past orange groves, canals and rural villages. From Murcia, you can head west inland on the Greenway of the Northwest, a 78 km line that links Murcia with Caravaca de la Cruz, one of the Holy Cities of the Catholic Church and a place famous for its spectacular 15th century castle.

Coastal Bicycle Paths

For cyclists who want to make the most of Spain’s sandy beaches and warm waters, there are plenty of coastal routes to choose from. If you’re feeling particularly adventurous, fly into Valencia and then make your way down the coast to Malaga. You’ll pass through the beach resort towns of Benidorm and Alicante (where you can get your sunbathing and clubbing fix) before reaching the Murcian towns of San Javier, Cartagena and Aguilas.

Once in Andalusia, head south along the coast to spots such as Carboneras, home of the famous Playa de los Muertos beach. Move on through the fishing village of San Jose, before finishing up in Almeria. Trust us – the journey will be tough on the legs but easy on the eyes!

The real beauty of taking a cycling tour of south east Spain is that it’s very easy to get budget flight deals, particularly if you travel off-peak. If you take your bike as well, your travel costs once you arrive will be dramatically reduced, which means more money for sightseeing, tapas and lots of cold Spanish beers.

Muy bueno!