BikeCommuters.com

Bike Your Drive!

Who are the real minorities?

On MtnBikeRiders.com, I posted a little blurb about Women who ride, are super cool. I also went into the subject of them being a minority in the sport, but even more of a minority would be black men and women mountain bikers…and the more I think of it…in commuting.

I’m sure this is going to sound really goofy, but I have YET to see a black man or woman commuter on the roads that I ride on. Could it be that The OC is just too white? Once in a great while I’ll see one or two, but the last time that happened was 2 years ago!

I’m curious to know if there are other parts of the country that has a more diverse collection of riders.

My $8.00 Knickers

Ok first of all they are not CAPRIS, they are KNICKERS!

Now that we have that established, I want to show off my new KNICKERS. I went to the local Goodwill and found these bad boys.

I’m going to take a wild guess that these might be for women, but who cares, I paid $8, not $100 for them!

More Xtracycle Footsies.

I recently swapped out my other bars on the Xtracycle because I needed them on my tandem. So I went with this beach cruiser bar that I had. But the only problem was that it was way too big. When ever I had to get on or off the bike, my leg would get caught.
xtracycle

So what I did was cut down the bars about 7 inches on each side…right where the bars started to bend. I reinstalled the grips and place the bar on the Xtracycle.

I then took the excess portion of the bars that I just cut and made them into footsies.

When I drilled the hole into the footsies, I tapped it and installed a screw to prevent it from falling out or moving around too much. I then installed some grips that I had laying around.

Some changes coming to Nick James’ city

New York City’s bronze medal from the Washington-based bike group represents an endorsement for the city’s efforts under Mayor Michael Bloomberg to promote cycling for a cleaner environment and a healthier populace.

“The way we think about transportation and how we use our limited street space is changing,” said Janette Sadik-Khan, the city’s transportation commissioner.

The city is installing 400 to 500 bike racks a year and plans to have more than 400 miles of bike lanes and paths by 2009. There will then be 1 mile of bike lane for every 10 miles of road; the ratio is now 1 to 15. In San Francisco, it’s 1 to 7.

In Brooklyn’s hipster-heavy Williamsburg section, the city reduced the space for car parking in favor of bike parking — a first — when it widened the sidewalk to fit nine new bike racks over the summer.

“It’s better because people used to chain their bikes to trees and house gates,” said Pedro Pulido, an architect who parked his bike at one of the new racks last week.

Read More Here.