Funny CraigsList Ads

I like to browse CraigsList bike ads during my lunch hour, there are some ads that you can’t believe that they are real. Here are a few:

21 SPEED MOUNTAIN BIKE THAT IS ABOUT 4 POUNDS IN WEIGHT EXTREMELY LIGHT BIKE AND FUN TO RIDE, NEW TIRES AND IN EXCELLENT CONDITION MAY NEED DE RAILER THOUGH FOR SWITCHING GEARS

A 4lb Mountain Bike!!!! WOW… It’s in excellent condition but it may need a new “de railer”

Bicycle with the lock $50

Please call

1-213-793-XXXX

Quick and to the point….

A terrific AND purple small girls bike. I am a 6 foot tall male, so I wanted to move on and get something better.
Great bike, a Magna Shale. Brakes make screech sometimes, can fix easily with grease. Comes w/ water bottle and matching helmet.
Pick up only

Man, I would have love to see this guy riding this bike! Grease on the brakes? let’s hope that this guy is not a bike mechanic..

I have a nice beach cruiser that I bout bout a year and a half ago…in total probably used about ten time has minor scratches from stoarage but nothing big…….cost about 350 new selling for about 225 to 250….it one of the nice long one……can send pictures apon request

Even spell check won’t save this poor soul…

Women’s bike – in good condition, just needs to have the tires blown up.

Need Dynamite???

KHS Green

Overview: When KHS unveiled the Green, I knew I had to test one. The KHS Green is a no frills, no thrills bicycle that will basically haul you and your stuff from point A to Point B. What is the major point of this bike? Price. I’ve seen the KHS Green sell for below $275 at bike shops. It is very hard to find a bicycle under $300 that comes with all the goodies for bike commuting. I used the KHS Green for my 4.6 mile one way commute, how did it fare? Read On..

KHS Green
A nice Sturdy rack for your panniers is a standard feature of the Green

First, here are the specs from the manufacturer:

Frame:Hi-Ten Classic Mens or Ladies Step-thru frame
Fork: Hi-Ten
Headset: 1″ Treaded
Rims: Weinmann ZAC21 silver anodized alloy 700 x 38c
Hubs: Shimano 3 speed Nexus Coaster Brake Rear Hub
Tires: Staad 700 x 38c
Spokes: 14G UCP, 36°
Front Derailleur: N/A
Rear Derailleur: Shimano 3 speed Nexus Coaster Brake Rear Hub
Shifters: Shimano 3 speed Nexus Revo Twist
Chain: 1/2″ x 1/8″
Crankset: 3-piece with complete chainguard
Pedals: VP alloy w/steel cage w/boron axle
Saddle: Dual Density with Elastomer Springs
Handlebar: 4″ rise
Stem: Alloy w/Tall Quill
Grips: Kraton
Brakes: Coaster Rear, Hand Brake Front
Color: Black
Frame Sizes: 17″, 21″ Men’s and 14″, 17″ Ladies
Extras: Fenders, Alloy Rear Carrier, Kick Stand, Bell and Rear Wheel Lock

KHS Green
Front and Rear Fenders, a must for soggy commutes

The Looks: The Green will definitely not win any beauty contests, but this could be a blessing in disguise since the bike will be less desirable to thieves. I personally like the solid Black with Green Accents paint scheme. The fenders and the chain guard kind of reminds me of a dutch style bike. I didn’t really care much for the handlebars, a more subtle riser bar can make the bike look better.

KHS Green
Full Chain Guard

The Ride: The bike felt very comfortable, the plush, wide saddle is a big plus for those who care about their butt not being so sore. The upright position was also comfortable, I didn’t experience any neck, back or wrist fatigue. I was expecting the Green to be a slouch due to the upright position, but I was cruising the streets at 16-17mph. I was actually surprised at the speeds that I reached even though I was not pedaling super hard. As far as handling goes, well, this is the Green’s weakness. The high center of gravity and the 700 cc wheels made it hard to turn on tight bends, I almost fell down once when I overshot a turn on the river trail as I was going a little too fast. Braking was not an issue, the front hand brake/rear coaster brake combo worked beautifully.

KHS Green
3 Speed Nexus integrated hub, adequate for short commutes

Hits:The bike comes with fenders, chain guard, rear rack, lock, suspension saddle and a bell. Just add your favorite lights! The bike is also low-maintenance, I never had to anything to the bike.


Integrated Wheel Lock

The integrated lock is also a plus, for those quick stops for a Slurpee or a 40oz (of Gatorade, of course), simply lock up the rear wheel and anyone that will try to run away with the bike will easily be caught. Cost, As I mentioned before, you can find this bike for less than $275.

KHS Green
Not a beauty Queen, but a great short commute bike.

Misses:Weight, yeah, this bike is a tank but what do you expect for less than $275??

My recommendation:Are you a person that wants to start bike commuting? Are you in a budget? Is your commute less than 5 miles and want to leave your $1,000 bike at home? The KHS Green is the bike for you!!! The Green may not win beauty contests or set speed records, but it will get the job done. I also think that this bike has potential to be a longer commute bike if a Nexus 7 or 8 speed is used instead of the 3, that will help out with climbing hills as well as the flats.

For More information, check out www.khsbicycles.com.

Bike your Drive!

Every company and/or site has a slogan, we’ve just came up with ours. Inspired by the “Bike your Walk” picture that I took in Glenwood Springs and based on Nick’s comment about yelling that to pedestrians I thought… why not yell

BIKE YOUR DRIVE!!

to motorists????

A few months ago I contacted a company that produced a product that could literally save a bike commuter’s life. This device has helped millions of people world wide. But this company made it better. Their product is nothing else that I’ve seen before and that’s what drew me to them.

I spoke to the owner for about 1/2 an hour on my cell phone, he asked me what the site was all about and why we wanted to review their product. I simply put it, if I am still alive to write a review, then this item served its intended purpose. If not…well, it failed.

He went on and on about how great their product is compared to the hundreds of other companies that make a similar device. However, their item was a bit extraordinary, and that’s why I wanted to test it.

He then tells me that they do very little advertising and reviews because he didn’t feel that reviews would give their product a fair evaluation. Their item is about 5 times more expensive than the average item that fits closest to their specs, but I’ve seen their stuff and if you’ve seen it too, you’d drop the money to get it.

In my opinion, their item could literally save bike commuter’s lives on the road. But, what disappointed me was this…towards the end of the conversation I had felt that we had come to an agreement and explained our review process and such. But as we said our good byes, I realized that this guy was just pulling my leg. Sure enough, about a month later, he still hasn’t returned my emails or phone calls.

It really is a shame since his product is pretty cool. Sure you’re wondering what is this great item that could save lives and why am I not telling you about it. Well here it is.

It’s a light system.

As to why this guy didn’t want us to review his product and get free exposure on our site and have over 1000 unique visitors a day see his item…dunno to be honest with you. I figure he must have felt that his company and its products were either too good for us or he was afraid we’d find a flaw in it. What ever it is, its a shame.

So to make sure our readers are safe, here are some companies that we’ve dealt and have some awesome products for bike commuters.

Cygolite
Down Low Glow
Nite Rider

If you want to make your own head light, check this out. Our friend Mike made it and he posted it on Instructables.

I don’t consider myself a Fixed Gear Rider expert, but I want to share some of my first time experiences riding a Fixed Gear bike to work.

The first Fixed Gear I ever ridden was a Bianchi Pista that belonged to Steve Boehmke, at that moment I knew I had to have one. Last November I received a Raleigh One Way to review for a previous site that I used write for, although it was a little big, I decided to ride it to work fixed gear style. Here’s what I quickly learned that nobody told me:

*Be mindful while turning. There’s no coasting thru the turns, so if you lean too much, your pedals may scrape causing you to fall.

*Use your brake to slow down on the downhills, if you don’t the super high cadence will cause you to bounce up and down or your feet will fly off the pedals making you look a little goofy.

*Be mindful of your pedal position when stopping, if your pedals are not in the position that you are used to while re-starting, you will have to push the bike or do a rolling start until your feet catch up with the pedals. This is not easily done while riding in traffic.

*Keep in mind that there is NO coasting, a habit that is really hard to break. If you forget, (and I guarantee that you will) the shock to your legs will not be pleasant.

Swobo Sanchez

After a few miles of riding you will get the hang of it, you will either hate it or love it. If you hate it, don’t give up, riding a fixed gear bike is fun and it will improve your endurance and riding form.