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Tag Archive: bicycle commuting

Product review: Adventuress Sunscreen Swipes

Even though summer is winding down, those sun’s rays can still damage your skin. If you spend any time on your bike in the daylight, sunscreen is a smart option.

Right at the beginning of the summer, the good folks at Adventuress send some of their handy sunscreen swipes for us to try.

sun_pads

These Adventuress sunscreen swipes easily stash into a jersey pocket or saddlebag — or really anywhere you might want to have one on hand for some sun protection. They are quite compact and well-sealed.

My favorite feature of these is their packaging, which offers a convenient “finger pocket” to keep your hands grease-free (very important while cycling). Simply peel off the seal, slip your fingers into the pocket and apply:

DSC_2288

I found that each swipe had enough to cover my forearms, neck, nose, and ears — all the places that bear the brunt of sun exposure at this time of the year. With careful application, I think a few more square inches of skin could be covered, too. The sunscreen formula is paraben- and fragrance-free, and didn’t feel at all greasy on the skin. The manufacturer claims the formula is gentle on sensitive skin, and it protects against UVA and UVB rays. It seemed to work, too — rides in the full sun left me burn-free every time I used a sunscreen swipe!

The Adventuress Sunscreen Swipes retail for $24.00 for a box of 24, and can be purchased directly from the Adventuress website. That’s pretty pricey, for sure, but you can’t beat the convenience of being able to stash these in a pocket for on-the-go use. They’re good to have on hand for emergency use, but I wouldn’t rely on them for daily full-coverage application on account of the price.

Check out the Adventuress website for a range of other skincare products.

Munich By Bike

 

Munich is one of the most beautiful, bike-friendly cities in Germany! Famous for its Oktoberfest where beer and girdles overflow, the place doesn’t get nearly enough the credit it deserves for its cycling routes and infrastructure. If you like getting on your bike and exploring, weekend breaks to Munich are a necessary and thoroughly enjoyable pastime. Here are a few ideas which will help you discover a side of Bavaria’s capital besides pale ale and leather shorts.
munich
If you don’t mind biking in urban environments, the downtown area is a great place to start your explorations. Try a “Tour of the Tors”! “Tor” is the German word for “gate” (oh, and for “goal” in soccer”!), and Munich’s old town had a good number of those. They’re all within a kilometer of each other, sometimes less, and if you go through them in succession, you’ll circumscribe the area behind the old fortification walls.

Keep in mind that some of the old gates no longer exist, but Sendlinger Tor, Karlstor, Türkentor, Siegestor, and Isartor still keep you running along the historically correct perimeter. In May 2014, an art project was launched to remind locals and visitors of the “lost gates” — the ones which wars and old age took down. You might come across curious art installations where you can stop by for a minute and read up on the missing pieces in Munich’s gate puzzle.

After a good time downtown, there are few things better than resting your eyes with some nature gazing. As industrial and rich as it is, Munich offers parks with sprawling fields and meandering bike and walking paths. The most famous destination is the English Garden, a green symphony of nature with 78 kilometers (yup, Europe is metric!) of biking routes. You can enjoy the sun or slip into the forested paths. Make your way to the Chinese Tower, one of Munich’s most legendary beer gardens, and have a well-earned break.

Another terrific biking destination is the Olympia Park not too far from the city center. A beautiful bridge with glass railings brings you to the start of your tour, and you can put your stamina to the test with several gentle slopes on your way to the park’s heart: the Olympic Stadium and the BMW Arena and Museum nearby. This route offers mostly sunny tracks and open spaces, with some culture and fun on the side for when you want to rest. A classic Munich bike tour, through and through!

olympia park

Munich is something of a cyclist’s paradise. You can get in some serious cycling while still cramming in the chance to experience culture.

 

Review: Dorcy Hawkeye Bike Lights

I thought I was doing just fine with my current bike light setup—yes, my front light is secured with electrical tape and it needs to be encouraged to turn on with a good smack or two. And yes, rear lights mysteriously disappear en route between my apartment and the office on a regular basis. Ok, who am I kidding, I need a new bike light system. Luckily for me, I’ve been tasked with testing out a couple different options. First up, Dorcy Hawkeye lights.

1-Dorcy Hawkeye Light

Dorcy doesn’t mess around with lights. The company’s products range from personal flashlights and headlamps to heavy duty spotlights and signal wands (for directing traffic). The Dorcy Hawkeye LED bike lights promise to pack a punch with the front light boasting 200 lumens, guaranteeing to light the path 200 meters down the road and to be seen from even further away—same goes for the rear light.

2-Dorcy lights in package

The Dorcy LED bike light  is not a dainty addition at nearly half a pound including three AA batteries. Even with the option of using rechargeable batteries, I’m not a big fan of battery powered devices, if only because I never seem to have extra batteries when I need them most.

3-Dorcy light out of the package

The battery cartridge has a satisfying barrel-like design, reminiscent of a revolver’s bullet chamber. Not sure why I like that so much, but I do. Though it doesn’t help the overall weight, which seems a bit hefty to me.

5. Dorcy light size

The light itself is much larger than most, nearly five inches long. But this is no ordinary bicycle light, my friends. Thanks to a patented quick release feature, the “durable aerospace-grade aluminum alloy, corrosion resistant” light chamber pops out of the bike clamp, transforming into a handheld flashlight. Snazzy.

With the rubber-padded bracket attachment, the light stayed secured to my handle bars with no obnoxious rattling (which is just the worst) or movement up and down. Dorcy claims that the bracket will fit any bike on the North American market, so I’m guessing this light will fit just as securely on nearly any bike.

4-Dorcy light on roy

The Dorcy Hawkeye features a wide-angle, rectangular light beam rather than a traditional focused beam, which helps to illuminate the entire road ahead while limiting (unnecessary) spread of light upwards. They also claim that this feature “will not blind pedestrians.” I tested this assertion by making my friend, Sarah stand still while I rode toward her, light blaring. Sarah still seemed to cringe way from the light, but once I rode closer, the beam did indeed remain below her eyes.

Dorcy

On to the rear light: the Dorcy Hawkeye Tail Light features three super high brightness LEDs that can be seen from 200 meters away. Like the front light, the rear light’s mounting clamp is tool-free and adjusts easily to fit snuggly on any 24 – 32 mm diameter seat post. Plus, the patented bracket adjusts for a horizontal or vertical orientation.

6-Dorcy rear light

Personally, I appreciated how the adjustable pin and padded clamp allowed me to really crank the bracket on for maximum security. No more losing a rear light on a packed train car or bumpy road! (Notice the velcro remains of a previous light still clinging to my seat post?)

7-Dorcy rear light mounted

For my first ride with these lights, I ventured out through Golden Gate Park to catch the sunset and make sure that it was good and dark for my return ride.

8-Dorcy Light Sunset

Both the rear and front lights have just two setting: steady beam and flashing. As promised, I felt like my lights could be seen from blocks and blocks away. Seriously, I was lighting up reflective street signs as far as I could see (maybe five or six blocks). Also, the front light has two slits on either side, allowing light to filter out and illuminate the area right and left of the rider. While this is a bonus for visibility, I found it to be distracting with the light shining in my eyes.

10-Dorcy light at the beach

For everyday commuting, the front light is a bit large and hefty for my tastes; on the other hand, I would definitely choose the Dorcy Hawkeye for my pre-sunrise rides through poorly lit backroads. Not only would I be well visible to traffic, but my path would also be lit clear as day.

The Dorcy Hawkeye LED Personal Light front bike light retails for $55.00 and can be purchased directly from Dorcy.com—same goes for the LED Bicycle Tail Light, which retails for about $13.99.

Please click here to read our review disclaimer as required by the Federal Trade Commission.

How to keep riding if you work from home

As you may know, life tends to throw us a few changes here and there. One of the major changes I’ve had to deal with was having to work out of my home. My office used to be about 8 miles away and I’d commute there with my bike. But now that my commute is literally a few steps away from my bedroom, I surprisingly get more riding done now than I did in the last 4 years.

Not sure if you know what it’s like to work from home, but you can get a bit of cabin fever. I know for myself I need to get out once in a while, interact with people, breath fresh air and get some sun. If you can relate to any of those, then here’s some things that I do to help me get my bike “fix” on.

1. I often have meetings at Starbucks about 2 miles away. I’ll hop on my bicycle and ride there. In fact I once took the sidecar to my meeting and my client was so impressed by this machine. However, I couldn’t convince him to go for a ride with it.
bicycle sidecar on bikecommuters.com

2. I go out for lunch. I’m in between Downtown Brea and Downtown Fullerton, so that means I’ve got plenty of choices to eat at. I also will arrange lunch dates with various friends who work or live in the area.

3. I run errands with my bicycle. If I’m out of ink for my printer or need more coffee beans or have to run to the bank, the bicycle is much easier than having to use my motorcycle or car. I actually use my motorcycle quite a bit. I do so when I have to run longer errands. But doing so poses it’s own challenges. With a motorcycle, I have to get on all my riding gear, get it out of the garage, make sure there’s gas and by the end of it, I smell like fumes…but it’s still better than having to take the car around town.

4. Just get out. Sometimes you don’t need any other reason to get out there and ride. Many times I find myself stuck…you know like writer’s block. So to get my mind flowing again, I get on the bike and ride around for about 10-15 minutes. It’s kinda like how dryer sheets help Tina Fey’s writing…

So if you work from home, you can still be a bike commuter. Just find ways to use your bicycle when you have to get out of your home.