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Tag Archive: bicycle insurance

Choosing the right cycle insurance

How to find a cycle insurance that’s worthy of your trust?

Reports can be blinding, but even if you are ready to treat a report as half truth, you will find many documents that report the average occurrence of bicycle thefts at 3 per hour! Not surprisingly, it’s easy to remember at least one person from your social circle who has lost a bicycle at some point. Cycle accidents and thefts are too common, giving you a lot to worry about. Thankfully, you have the option of cycle insurance policies that cover you from the several problems that cycle accidents and damages can lead to. Having made up your mind about purchasing insurance for your bicycle, it’s now time that you learned some tips and tricks that can help you find the perfect cycle insurance product.

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An insurance policy that extends to your bicycles?

The market for cycle insurance products is witnessing rapid innovation, and you might not be too far away from home insurance policies that also cover your bicycles and extend lots of benefits. Such an insurance policy can help policy holders enjoy less complexity and more peace of mind. Moreover, cycles are integral parts of the lives of all those who love them, much like their homes. In fact, the front porch or the backyard might look alien to a few unless they see their beloved bicycles safely parked there. So, extended home insurance covers certainly auger well for such passionate cycling enthusiasts. Watch out for the cycle insurance products that New Insurance for Cyclists has in plan, ready to be unleashed into the markets really soon.

Ask a lot of questions – When an agent throws marketing material at you, dodge all of it and pose some stern questions. If the cycle insurance company pitching a product to you is actually good, it will have the answers. Is the bike covered when it’s not at home? Does accidental damage cover include property damage? Is theft included in the coverage? What if you’re in a different country, riding the same bike? Your questions must be relevant to the kind of use you put your bicycle to. For instance, you might want to focus your questions upon the accidental coverage aspect more than overseas coverage unless you are a bicycle tourist who often visits foreign countries.

Ensure that your bicycle’s unique accessories are also covered

Whereas those super special and wide grip tires might be the flesh and bones of your bicycle for you, the insurance company might consider them beyond the realms of coverage under the policy. It is imperative that when you hunt for the right cycle insurance policy, every trivial detail about the bicycle and your using habits must be considered before you sign the plan agreement. Another important issue you need to be aware about is the reparability and the replacement of your bicycle parts. As a dedicated cyclist, you might not want to go ahead with a policy that wants you to get your damaged tires repaired instead of replaced! The perfect cycle insurance cover is not too far away from you; something special is on its way from YellowJersey.co.uk to set the cycle insurance market abuzz.

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Guest Article: So you hit the ground. What next?

Editor’s note: the following piece was written by Jay Paul, founder of the cyclist-oriented insurance firm Balance for Cyclists. Balance for Cyclists is one of our advertising partners. Don’t let that scare you off; there’s a lot of good step-by-step instruction within in the event you or someone you know is involved in a bicycle crash.

Bicycling is usually a very safe activity. However, as cyclists we are all keenly aware that an accident can happen at almost any time. Most cycling accidents result in injuries like road rash, a bloody chin or a minor laceration. The more serious accidents require immediate medical attention and perhaps a hospital stay.

So what is a cyclist to do if they are involved in an accident or with a fellow rider who happens to become a victim of inertia and gravity?

The internet is full of law firms soliciting advice on what to do if you are involved in a collision with a motor vehicle. Most end with a polite solicitation for the injured cyclist to call them for legal advice. Now I certainly don’t fault a personal injury attorney for making a living and cyclists need to know their rights after a serious accident. However, it is estimated that less than 30% of serious cycling accidents involve a motor vehicle. The rest are either rider error, equipment failure or the result of some other road hazard.

Riders need to be aware of what to do regardless of the cause of the accident. Below are some thoughts.

1. Take all necessary steps to protect and stabilize the injured cyclist. Make certain that the injured person is not in additional harms’ way. If the accident involves a head or neck injury do not move the rider but do place barriers up the road or trail that will slow traffic.
2. Call emergency personnel. Both the Police and EMT if necessary.
3. Even if the injury is minor, consider getting medical attention. All too often immediately after an accident the injured cyclist is in shock and not aware of the extent of their injuries. Too many injured riders just want to get back on their bike and start peddling as if nothing has happened.
4. Make certain that if police are involved that they take the statement not just from the motorist but from the cyclist as well.
5. If a vehicle is involved obtain driver information from the motorist. This includes: name, address & contact information of driver, make, model & serial number of car, determine the vehicle owner, insurance information of vehicle.
6. Regardless of whether a vehicle is involved get statements from any witnesses that happened to see the accident. (More on this later)
7. Get photographs of the accident scene and preserve evidence. Many if not most of us carry cell phones with cameras while riding. Get a lot of pictures from different angles. Take note of weather and road conditions.
8. If a vehicle is involved, never negotiate with the driver.
9. Certain accidents that don’t involve a motor vehicle could still be compensable. Equipment failure, errant pedestrians or road hazards are such examples. Make certain if at all possible to get photographs of the site where the accident occurred and of the bike itself. (This is also where a witness statement could prove beneficial.)
10. Here is the plug for personal injury attorneys. Never attempt to negotiate with the “at fault parties” insurance company. Get a good attorney to represent your interests. Most major cities have at least one attorney who has created a cyclist specialty practice. They are usually cyclists themselves. Many of these same firms have apps online that you can download to your phone that outline what to do in the event of an accident.

One last bit of advice. Consider getting First Aid certified and, if a mountain biker, consider getting certified in Wilderness First Aid. Having the confidence to make a quick decision immediately after an accident could save a friend’s life. These classes can help give you that confidence.

Finally, follow the rules of the road and be aware of your surroundings. That means take out one of your earbuds!