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Tag Archive: bike commuting

How To Hang Your Bike on a Vertical Rack

Have you ever been 5-foot-n-change and tried to hang your bike vertically on moving transportation? Well, I have! This week my combo commute took a rainy Cantaloupe and I for quite a ride as we perfected the Art of Racking. And by Art of Racking, of course I am referring to hanging your bike on wall or ceiling-mounted vertical racks. From bike storage rooms to moving TriMet MAX cars, you TOO can hang your bike vertically despite being vertically challenged!

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Blurry photos… because I’m just that unstable on public transit. (Look, the doors are open, it wasn’t even moving yet)

This “How To” is a feat worth sharing and a basic commuter skill that everyone should keep in their cerebral saddle bag. Here’s a picture narrative of how to get a heavy-ass steel steed like Cantaloupe all vertically racked up without spazzing out and injuring bystanders:

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And… TADA!!! Vertically racked and totally stacked.

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Cantaloupe and the Art of Racking

Now, go ahead and make humping and straddling jokes all you want, but smashing the saddle of the bike into your stomach really makes it much easier to balance a heavy bike and navigate the front tire up onto the hook. Other options include growing taller, asking for help, or riding a lighter bike. I’ll stick with stomach-saddle-smashing for a perfect 10 in the Art of Racking.

 

Friday Musings – Autumn Bike Bliss

Holy Rusted Metal-colored leaves, Bikeman – fall is here, and I hope you commuters haven’t missed out on the lovely leaves spiraling from the trees around your neighborhood. After several years in a less-than-autumn climate known as Hawaii, Mir.I.Am muses on a bike bliss, a.k.a. the awesomeness of autumn commuting!

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Last week, I was swept away by a colorful, picturesque commute along the river. Bike sharrows, blue skies, falling leaves, and a wide greenway was a recipe for Ultimate. Autumn. Bliss. I’ll take a lovely 3-mile jaunt like this at no sweat speed any day… Move over, Portland Streetcar, Cantaloupe is out in full fall force!

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How do you take a picture like this? Maybe assault random strangers walking on the Greenway and beg them to be your mom-shot photographer? Oh. Yeah…

Cantaloupe decided to chill out on the waterfront as I went in search of foods and hot beverages…

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I’m pretty sure this is one of those fancy bridges over the river.

First stop: waterfront coffee at the Bean and Tree and some laptop work time.

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Is it just me, or does lipstick on a cup always remind you of your mom’s coffee?

Second stop: Verde Cocina Buenos Dias Breakfast – featuring giant cubes of sweet ‘n’ savory bacon and local greens at the Portland Farmer’s Market.

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This is food for two cycle humans, by the way. I did not eat this all on my own.

And SURPRISE: if you take a new route back home, you might pass by some space tubes.

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Just kidding! They are lockable rain covers for your bikes.

Sometimes it’s worth it to take the long route and enjoy the ride. Forget rushing and cranking and sweating and red light cursing, slow it down for a little autumn bike commuter bliss before it gets too cold.

Rose City-Me – a.k.a. Interbike 2013 Jealousy

For those of us who did not attend Interbike 2013, meaning the majority of the bike population, I’ve got one thing to say: Rose City-me, bikey ladies and gentlefolks!” (Think “beer-me” a la Andy from The Office…) This past week, as the Bike Commuters gang was hanging out in the desert soaking up bikes and sun, the rest of us were hanging out in our daily lives, fending off jealousy and ogling posts from Jack and RL. Or maybe that was just me. Hanging out in Portland, the capital of bikey hang-a-langs (a.k.a. not Las Vegas, the capital of Interbike 2013) I like to pretend that everyday could be considered an Interbike-worthy moment!

In fact, Portland makes me want to snap pics of bikes with my crappy i-phon skills (only one step up from Retired Asian Dad photo skills). I may not have a cool camera like RL or Jack, a camera so sweet it’s capable of capturing high-resolution bike porn like this and this and that. And I may be taking total creeper photos of other commuters at stop lights or bikes locked up at racks, but it’s all I got, damnit… and I’ll take what I can get. Maybe I could call this post “Portlerbike 2013” or “InterPort 2013” or “Lotsabikes in Portland 2013” and cross my fingers for an air-drop of SWAG.

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The Schwinn le Tour II hath arrived! (Pics don’t get any crappier than this, thanks i-phon)

The mediocre photographer inside of me is inspired on a daily basis by all that this bike-friendly city has to offer. And that includes bike selfies. Yessir, this means if my bike had arms, it would take pictures of itself being shipped from Menlo Park, CA all they way to Portland, OR. Oh man, oh man, are Shwinney and I happy to be reunited! (Shout out to Chris, Aaron, Kelli, and Emily for crazy bike shipping coordination efforts.)

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Now to unpack it and get it to the LBS for some pedal action.

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Almost there…

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Made it! She’s a beauty.

So it seems like my bike commuting life is getting back to normal for the abnormal Mir.I.Am, with bike storage in the basement of our building, a multi-speed orange steed at my side, and plenty of bike lanes to cruise in a flat-like-an-A-cup city. I’m all about you, Portland. Screw Vegas. Enjoy the pics, Bike Commuters:

New Wool Cap Contest

You can win a brand new BikeCommuters.com Wool Cycling Cap (size Larege/XL)!
bikecommuters.com wool cap
To enter, upload a photo of your commuter bike onto our Facebook Fanpage by April 26th, 2013. Then our staff will vote on which bike is our favorite. We’re not looking for anything specific. But I do know our staff has a mix of what they think is a cool bike. We like fast road bikes, mountain bikes, single speeds, vintage bikes, Bakfiets, cargo bikes, Xtracycles, Trikes, E-bikes, bikes that have sweet lugs on the frame, pretty bikes, colorful bikes, Franken-bikes, pink bikes, purple bikes and even regular looking bikes!

Good luck!

We’ll announce a winner the following Monday.

Are You in the Top 25 Percent?

If you walk or bike somewhere at least once a week*, the answer is yes!

According to a study from the American Journal of Preventative Medicine, less than a quarter of adults in the U.S. walk or bike for transportation more than 10 minutes per week. Pretty pathetic…


The study credits “active transportation” (mostly biking and walking) regularly with a variety of improved health conditions such as lower BMI and waist circumference, and much lower levels of hypertension (high blood pressure) and diabetes (up to 30%!).

From the study discussion:

Active transportation is an untapped reservoir of opportunity for physical activity for many U.S. adults. A study using the National Household Transportation Survey found similar low utilization of active transportation, with only 19% of Americans aged ≥5 years reporting walking or bicycling for transportation. In contrast to the U.S., many European countries experience high population levels of active transportation. In Germany, the proportion of individuals reporting any walking or cycling for transportation are two and seven times greater than in the U.S., respectively.These differences are in part due to policies, community planning, and infrastructure design that make active transportation appealing. Implementing similar strategies in the U.S. could have important implications for individuals with time or financial constraints that prohibit leisure-time physical activity or with professions and work environments that are not conducive to occupational physical activity.

The authors finish by noting that their research provides “additional justification for infrastructure and policies that permit and encourage active transportation.”

Is there a little bit of a, “well, duh” factor to this? Yes, probably… but it’s pretty encouraging that instead of just being told “people need to exercise more!” these researchers have come out and identified our infrastructure as a big part of the problem. If we make it easy for people to bike and walk, we’ll have more people biking and walking… and a lot fewer people with health problems.

*And also live in the U.S. of A. Sorry international readers, you’re all wonderful too but these statistics don’t apply to you!

Via everydayhealth.com