BikeCommuters.com

Tag Archive: BikeCommuters

Top 3 Articles in the HISTORY of BikeCommuters.com

bikecommuters.com

So I was perusing through BikeCommuters.com and found that we have written nearly 3000 articles since we opened up our doors in 2008! Out of all those articles, some of the most popular ones keep getting hit by various search engines. So I went ahead and picked out some of the top 3 articles being searched on the site.

1.10 Bike Commuting Myths Dispelled.

1. I’m out of shape

— Ride an easy pace, in a few months you will be in great shape
— Ride your route on a weekend to find the easiest way to work
— You will improve your fitness level when you become a regular bike commuter

2. It takes too long

— The average commuter travels at 10 mph; the more you ride, the faster you become
— Trips of less than 3 miles will be quicker by bike
— Trips of 5 to 7 miles in urban areas take the same or less by car

3. It’s too far

— Try riding to work and taking mass transit home, then alternating the next day
— Combine riding and mass transit to shorten your route
— Ride to a coworker’s house and carpool to work

 

2. P-Clamps Are Your Friends Find out what these things are used for. Just to let you know how popular this article is. If you do a search on Google for “P Clamps Bikes”, out of 1,610,000 results, this article shows up on the first page in 1st position. That basically means this article has so many people looking at it and linking. Because of this article, I’ve actually used P Clamps on other projects that didn’t involve bicycles. I used it to secure a motorcycle seat on a cafe racer project I was building.

Bikecommuters.com p-clamps

3.DIY Bicycle Repair Stand by Andrew Li. This article came to us by way of Dr. Li himself. He is our most reliable volunteer at our Bicycle Repair for The Homeless effort that we do in Santa Ana, Ca. He comes out with his DIY stand and will wrench on bikes for a few hours and his creation has withstood the abuse throughout the years.

diy bicycle repair stand bikecommuters.com andrew li

There you have it. Those are the top 3 articles coming out of BikeCommuters.com. Don’t get me wrong, there are a ton of them that are great, but people are searching for those types of articles and we’re glad we could provide our readers, new and old a resource that is not only useful, but can also save you money.

I felt safer on the street than the grocery store parking lot

I was on my way home when I decided to make a detour at the local grocery store to get a few items for the home. As I make my way through the parking lot, I was greeted by aggressive drivers who seemed to be in a rush. There were work trucks, Mad Moms in Minivans, the elderly (nursing home nearby) and a few rogue shopping carts.shopping center
Gosh, I have to say I felt so vulnerable and so much more at risk riding through the parking lot than I did when I was on the street! I had vehicles coming at me from all directions and none of them seem to be paying attention to me since I wasn’t a car. Luckily I made it in the store…but now that I’m done shopping, I gotta try and get home! Wish me luck!

The Classic 2.0 Garment Pannier by Two Wheel Gear

THE CLASSIC 2.0 GARMENT PANNIER

Not too long ago we tested out “The Southwest Waxed Canvas Bike Suit Bag.” Since then, the guys at Two Wheel Gear sent us their updated version of the bag. This time around, they’ve made some changes, mainly in the material they used. Rather than canvas, they went with polyester. Here are some of the main features of the bag:

THE CLASSIC 2.0 GARMENT PANNIER

MATERIAL 600D Polyester with TPE waterproof backing and UV coating
MOUNTING SYSTEM Universal RIXEN & KAUL Vario mounting system – RACK MOUNTING INSTRUCTIONS
INTERNAL ORGANIZATION Stores 3-5 garments, 3 internal mesh pockets for belts, ties, workout shorts, shirts, watches, cufflinks, jewelry, padded 15″ laptop storage
NIGHT VISIBILITY High visibility reflective accents
WATERPROOF RAIN COVER 210 HD Nylon – inverts into clip-on pouch – neon green with reflective silver accents
DETAILS  Padded removable shoulder strap, carry handles, signature monogram liner, zippered mounting hardware access, utility loops for reflective lights and accessories, YKK zippers, top bag hanger/handle, padded internal garment strap, reflective exterior pattern

Product Overview:

  • The functionality of a travel garment bag on your bicycle
  • Meets standard airline carry-on requirements
  • Stores approximately 3-5 hangers/garments
  • Hangs vertical for convenient changing and packing
  • Extra deep side pockets pack shoes, towels, toiletries, etc.
  • Bike to work with wrinkle free clothing

During our testing period we made sure we used the garment bag with our finest duds. As you can see below, the hanger hooks onto a loop and can be secured so it doesn’t fall (the hanger) during transport. Notice the mesh pockets right above the shoulders of my clothing. Those are great for storing for storing small things like jewelry, deodorant, doodads and just about anything that could fit in there. Further down the bag is a security strap; this is great because it prevents your clothing from moving around and we all know that when clothes move around, the more chances of getting wrinkled. THE CLASSIC 2.0 GARMENT PANNIER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In addition you have another mesh pocket to store your g-string or if you like going commando and don’t have a need to store underwear, you can put socks in there. Beneath that is a padded pocket to store a laptop, iPad or a slice of pizza (wrapped of course).

What you see below has to be my favorite feature of the bag. It has a reflective pattern that allows you to be seen while riding. Also you’ll notice the two large side pockets, you can put your shoes in there. I don’t know about you, but I like to wear cycling shoes when I’m riding and when I get to my office, I’ll slip on a fresh pair of work-appropriate footwear. The other side pocket can be used to store your lunch or whatever else you need to bring with you to the office. The top pocket is perfect for keeping a multi-tool, pump and snacks.

The bag is equipped with briefcase handles as well as a detachable shoulder strap. Having both options makes it much easier to carry with you. By the way, you can even travel on an airplane with this bag since it meets airline carry-on requirements.

THE CLASSIC 2.0 GARMENT PANNIER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notice the reflective rain cover that the Garment Pannier comes with. It’s Hi-Vis to help drivers see you on the road during a down pour. I didn’t get an opportunity to test that feature since living in Southern California, we rarely see rain, all thanks to the drought. THE CLASSIC 2.0 GARMENT PANNIER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Garment Pannier is equipped with a great locking mechanism that ensures that your bag will not fly off your rack. It uses something called Universal RIXEN & KAUL Vario mounting system. It’s pretty self explanatory on how it works, but you can read all about it HERE. Please forgive my shoddy photo, I’m still trying to convince the boss to let us upgrade our camera from 1993. But you get an idea on how it mounts from this photo.

THE CLASSIC 2.0 GARMENT PANNIER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that you’ve got an clear understanding on how the bag is supposed to work, let’s get into the nitty gritty of the review. I used it for a few hundred miles during our testing phase. I’ve even used it to travel to various trade shows in various parts of the country. One thing that stands out with the Classic 2.0 Pannier is that it really is a versatile and robust bag. Not only is it easy to use, but it’s pretty tough. It must be the 600D polyester they use because this bag has seen some asphalt in its day. There was a few times where I haphazardly mounted the bag without securing it and decided to jump a speed bump or ride off the curb and down went the bag. A few times it slid down the road for about 10 feet. But nothing happened to it! The material was still in great condition, none of the hardware broke, and my stuff in side was still intact.

I think the most appealing part about this bag is it’s looks. Nothing about it screams that you’re a bike commuter. I like how it’s not bulky like other panniers I’ve owned. It’s professional looking and may I add, very handsome. So if you want to look like a boss when you get to work, make sure your clothes don’t look like you just pulled them out of the hamper. No! Arrive looking crisp and fresh. But you can’t do that with just a plain pannier bag. Those other bags will leave your office attire all jacked up and molested looking. The Classic 2.0 Garment Pannier is the way to go. Consider it an investment for your career and if you’re self-employed, I’m sure you could write this bag off somehow.

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Book Review: Bicycle Design: An Illustrated History

Bicycle Design: An Illustrated History fills in the gaps on how the awesomeness that is the bicycle came to be.

Up-front confession: this book was not featured (so far as we know) at Interbike!

However, it DOES chronicle pretty much all the innovations throughout bicycling history, so rest assured that the predecessors to many of the “new” things there are mentioned in it!

Bicycle Design: An Illustrated History is by Tony Hadland and Hans-Erhard Lessing, and in the authors’ words seeks to fill the neglected gap addressing the technical aspects of the history of the bicycle. It starts out with… well, actually it starts out with ice skating and wheelbarrows… but it quickly moves on to velocipedes and draisines, the predecessors of the bicycle.

Another confession: I haven’t read the whole thing. I did read all the bits about velocipedes and high-wheel bikes and wire wheels and the development of the safety bicycle (aka a bike having 2 wheels of the same size), but after that concluded that this wasn’t really meant to be read straight through – and yeah, it took me a bit longer to figure that out than it might take most people, but what can I say… I’m a bit of a bike nerd!

 

Apparently we should call these draisines!

So after some deliberation, I’d consider this more of a reference book: the next time you wonder, “when WAS the first bamboo frame made?” rest assured that this is the place you can find that answer! (page 178: 1890’s, patented in 1896. Calfee wasn’t exactly the first!).

The first 5 chapters of the book detail the history up to the invention of the diamond-frame steel bicycle. After that point, it diverges into chapters on different aspects of bikes, such as transmission, braking, and lighting. It also – at the end – includes specific sections on “racing” bicycles and mountain bikes, folding bikes, and military bikes (an interesting chapter!).

Overall this is a very informative book, and I say kudos should go to the authors for assembling all of the information in a scholarly fashion, complete with TONS of references at the back (if anyone out there needs to write a term paper on anything about bicycles, this should be your starting point!).

My one minor (major?) complaint about it is that it reminds me of several of my history classes in high school. How so? No, not because I fell asleep… I like history, and this book is written pretty well, so I didn’t do that during either high school or while reading this! It’s because in high school I had several years of history classes where we spent a ton of time on something early in the semester… and then gradually less and less time per topic, until by the end we rushed through the 1960’s on in only a couple weeks (I don’t think I had a history class that ever made it to the decade we were in!). Bicycle Design reminds me of this: it spends a lot of time on early development, but we get to the end and there are a scant 10 pages on mountain bikes. Two paragraphs on disc brakes. Two pages on suspension. Etc. etc. Yes, these are relatively recent in the scheme of things – but they’re BIG things right now, they involve some pretty neat increases in bicycle capabilities, and they deserve to be included… not lumped together in a hash that includes everything from the 1970’s til now in a handful of paragraphs.

Gripes regarding recent history aside, this is something every serious bicyclist should at least flip through sooner or later. I highly doubt many people (apart from the authors) have a good grip on all of the developments mentioned in its pages, so you’re guaranteed to learn something (and probably something interesting!). At $20-something on Amazon (for a nice hardcover), it’s definitely worth picking up for the coffee table, or for the bike-themed coffee shop, or for the bike shop, or for a stocking stuffer, if Santa’s real nice and someone you know has a stocking that can accommodate a 564-page volume.

Please click here to read our review disclaimer as required by the Federal Trade Commission.