BikeCommuters.com

Tag Archive: giles berthoud

Commuter Profile: Sarah Eberhardt

Oooh Cycle Ladies and Gents – please give a round of applause for our latest Commuter Profile starlette – hot, strong, and ready to bike down the red carpet… SARAH EBERHARDT hailing from Los Angeles, California!

P1040380c

Sarah Eberhardt commutes in downtown L.A.

sarahe9

Sarah bikes to LIVE, here she is in San Diego, CA.

Name: Sarah Eberhardt

How long have you been a bike commuter?

Since 2005- the inception of my cycling life as we know it! 1/4 of my life I have been commuting via bike! Yeah! =)

Why did you start riding your bike to work and how long is your commute?

Let’s rephrase the Q – I bike to live and know that 2 miles is my ideal commute. I drew a 2 miles radius around my workplace, and chose where to live that was precisely 2 miles away from work. Any more than that, I’d get lazy some days (come on – who doesn’t find an excuse to drive their car if they have one?); any less, it wouldn’t be enough cardio to jump start my day.

sarahe1

Sarah with the baby blue Fuji Bordeaux, prior to thieving thievery... in Taos, NM.

How does Bike Commuting help you with your lifestyle (economics, health, relationships)?

How does bike commuting NOT help my lifestyle? I could go on for days, but bike commuting was the primary purpose of my move to Los Angeles – where all conditions align for the epitome of bike commuting environments – sunshine 364 days a year, no rain, no flash storms, acute temperature deviations from 70 degrees, mildly conscious drivers – all giving me a daily commute unlike the norm in Los Angeles.

sarahe

Definitely all smiles in Downtown LA, I love it!

I have a smile on my face every day I am going to work. My commute time is not based on traffic pattern surprises or sudden road closures – it is 12 minutes each way, plus or minus one minute for red lights. I save gas money. I save parking fees. I save parking hunt headache in downtown LA.

sarahe2

Hmmm, this one doesn't look like commuting in Copenhagen... must be mountain biking the Rio Grande in Taos, NM!

What do you do for a living and in what city do you bike commute?

Architect by degree and banquet server by recession, I bike commute daily within downtown Los Angeles. I have owned a bike and commuted while living months at a time in Cleveland, OH; Cincinnati, OH; Copenhagen, Denmark; Berkeley, CA; and Taos, NM.

What kind(s) of bike do you have?

I’m on my 3rd road bike since 2005 and her name is Igriega (because it sounds like “egret” and it is my favorite Spanish word – she makes me fly past the egrets that wade in the LA River along many of my weekend warrior rides). She is a solid carbon fiber Trek Madone and the bike of my dreams. She soars me through the heavy clouds (cough cough *smog*) of LA.

sarahe5

Thugs for Life, Bikes for Life - laying down with her black Bianchi in Cincinnati, OH.

Prior to her, my virgin roadie was an aluminum baby blue Fuji Bordeaux- stolen on Berkeley’s campus (NEVER USE CABLE LOCKS!!). My interim roadie was a steel black and teal Bianchi Imola – the thug bike – I suspect it was a stolen bike (even though I checked it with stolenbicycleregistry.com) and again, was stolen off the trunk rack of my car in Koreatown LA. That bike had bad bike karma – it was destined to be passed from thief to rider to thief to rider.

sarahe7

Using the Iron Horse MTB for a leisure MTB ride on Catalina Island off coast of Cali

I also own a less momentous Iron Horse mountain bike for non-road friendly treks.

sarahe3

"What the hell?!" - Mir.I.Am's reaction.

Any funny or interesting commuting story that you may want to share?

While living in New Mexico, I once carried home a 3 foot diameter tumbleweed on my back that I found to use as décor. It is a lot harder to bike one-handed with a large prickly odd-shaped object strewn over your shoulder!

sarahe4

Response from Sarah, "Tumbleweed in Taos, NM!" Obviously.

What do people (coworkers, friends) say when you tell them that you are a bike commuter?

“Oh my, is that safe?” “Do you even bike at night?”

If you’re surrounded in steel, it’s not necessarily safer than riding on top of steel. So yes, it is as safe as driving in a car, and yes I use bike lights.

How about bicycling advocacy? Are you active in any local or regional advocacy groups?

No.

Anything else that you want to share with us?

YES, I’m renowned for a series of jumping photos in epic places — some of these places I was lucky enough to have had my bike along for the journey.

sarahe8

Jump photo time on the LA River trail.

sarahecouple

Coronado Island in San Diego, leisure ride with Sarah's man Valentin for weekend warrior adventures.

Sarah, thanks for sharing your fun-fun photogs and awesome sauce profile with us.  You’ve reaffirmed my personal belief that women on bikes are just plain hot!  Want to show us your ride and tell us all about it, lovely Bike Commuters?  Then send an email and we’ll hook you up with a Commuter Profile questionnaire!  Email mir[at]bikecommuters[dot]com for details.

Just Ask Jack — Quick Release Fenders?

John, also known as Moveitfred By Bike sent in the following question:

“Do you have any recommendations for fenders? I’m looking for something that’s easy on and off for a steel frame cyclocross bike with cantilever brakes. “

My initial response to him was that unfortunately, you can’t have it both ways: you can either have GOOD fenders, or you can have “easy on/easy off” fenders.

For example, the SKS Race Blade — they go on and off very quickly, but they don’t provide enough coverage to really keep you and your bike clean and dry. Same goes with the seatpost-clamping rear fenders. Same with the clip-on front mini-fender that goes on the downtube.

I’ve tried a couple modern brands of fenders, notably the Zefal Cafe models and the Planet Bike full-coverage fenders with integral mudguards. The Planet Bike ones are substantially better (better hardware, more versatile).

The more I thought about it, though, I realized you CAN “have your cake and eat it too.” One trick some folks use to make the fenders go on and off easier is to thread longer mounting bolts “inside out” (from the inside of the fork/dropout bosses toward the outside of the frame) and using metric wingnuts to attach the stays and struts. Still, it’s not a 30 second removal process!

I had stumbled across a photographic tutorial of this setup on the Web several months back, and rediscovered it while I spoke to John via email. Here are the particulars:

Alex Wetmore (an amazing tinkerer… on his blog, check out the “to die for” workshop in his basement!!!) wrote a tutorial on this method on his website…and has allowed me to share a couple pictures of the setup with you. The first is the fender attachment at the fork crown:

attachment at fork crown

The second photo is one where the fender stays attach to the braze-ons of the fork:

Attachment at fork braze-ons

As mentioned earlier, you might have to find longer mounting bolts for the fenders to make this work, but that isn’t too difficult.

If you go for really blingy, indestructible fenders, I heartily recommend either Honjo or Giles Berthoud fenders. Honjos come in fluted, smooth or hammered-finish aluminum, while the Berthoud ones come in stainless steel. The mounting hardware and struts are without peer, and either brand is so gorgeous that you won’t want to take them off!

Either Peter White Cycles of New Hampshire or Velo Orange in Annapolis, MD carry these kinds of fenders…might be worth checking out!

Setting up your fenders this way makes the bike more versatile. On days you don’t need the protection and don’t want to push the extra weight around, just slip the fenders off and ride. Bad weather in the forecast? Pop the fenders right back on. It’s a great tip, and we’d like to thank John for sending in the question and Alex Wetmore for letting us use his photographs of the process.

Have a cycling-related question? Just Ask Jack! Click on the link in the right-hand column to send me your questions.