BikeCommuters.com

Bike Your Drive!

Vintage Schwinn Tempo

I scored on a free Schwinn Tempo. I don’t know if a bike that was made in the early or mid 80s would be considered vintage, but it’s an old bike!

One of the things I needed to do was remove the cranks for another project bike. But the original dust caps that came on it seized in them and I couldn’t put in the crank puller because the plastic was all over the threads.

I figured if I torch it out, it should melt away the plastic and I can get the cranks off. But one problem. I don’t have a torch. So I grabbed the next best thing, a can of brake cleaner and a lighter!

After a few minutes of flame throwing, I was able to thread in my crank puller!

KHS Flite 100

What’s the coolest way to commute? On a Fixie!

KHS Flite 100

Here’s some specs on it:

Frame
Reynolds 520 Double Butted full CrMo
Fork CrMo track
Headset Threadless
Rims Weimann SP17 Alloy
Hubs Alloy Flip-Flop Track
Tires Kenda Koncept 700x23c, Kevlar
Spokes 14G Stainless 36°
Front Derailleur N/A
Rear Derailleur N/A
Shifters N/A
Chain KMC Z30
Crankset Sugino 165mm x 48T
Bottom Bracket Sealed Cartridge
Cassette Shimano Dura-Ace SS-7600, 16T
Pedals Alloy road w/toe clips & straps
Seatpost Alloy micro-adjust
Saddle San Marco Ponza Lux
Handlebar Alloy track bend
Stem Alloy 3D Forged
Tape Cork Tape
Brake Levers N/A
Brakes N/A
Color Flat Dark Gray
Frame Size 50, 53, 57, 60cm (measured center-to-center

To learn more about it, CLICK HERE!

My Favorite Commuter Bike, Redline 925

Here’s an update on my favorite rig to ride.

It started off as a stock bike with fenders and moustache bars.

Eventually I got rid of the bars, fenders and installed some Sweetskinz tires and made my own bull horns.

redline 925 customized

I love this bike! I haven’t found another bike that I have been so lovingly affectionate with. It’s my commuter and my grocery getter!

When Not To Ride?

On Sunday a wild fire broke out in Orange County Ca. The fire it self was a few cities away, but the sky has been gray from the smoke.

So this afternoon when I went to grab my bike out of my porch, I noticed something on the bike…ashes from the fire. With all the Santa Ana winds that has been blowing around lately, cars and anything else that has been sitting for a while has a lite dusting of ash.

I’m not so sure if you can tell, but my Redline 925 had some dust all over it. So as I rode away, I was wondering if I should even be riding my bike right now. Couldn’t the ashes do something bad to my lungs later on?
ashes

I know there are some die-hards that don’t stop riding no matter how bad the weather is. I’ve heard of some guys out on their bikes 16 below zero and others riding in 110 degree heat!

But what about in this situation should someone ride their bike and in hale the ashes that’s circulating through the air?

For myself, I kinda regretted my little excursion because after my ride, my throat was burning!

Weather Has Been Great!

Last week Priscilla decided to commute to her work. So I decided to ride with her to the office. Here’s some pics of our ride.

Here’s Priscilla loading her bike up the elevator.

Off to work she goes!

DIY Messenger Bag

A few weeks back my brother sent me a link on how to make a messenger bag. I checked it out and decided to try to make one. I used one of the patterns from the site but added a few things that I thought would work better. All materials were graciously donated from several areas of my work. 😉
Black nylon cloth, gray tarp material, and padding.

Materials used

I then measured out the dimensions I needed and cut out all the pieces.

Measurements

cut pieces

I made this bag from one piece of material not counting the liner and padding used. I would suggest to make your bag from a couple of smaller pieces and puzzle them together. It was difficult to maneuver one big piece in and around the sewing machine.

sewing together

Here is what the bag looked like once everything was sewn together.

bag

After looking at how plain this bag looked, I decided to put some pockets underneath the cover flap. This procedure should have been done prior to puzzling the bag together. It would save you so much time and effort if you plan out exactly how you want your bag to look like. Something I figured out after the fact.

pockets

The last thing I worked on was the shoulder strap. I wanted to have an interchangeable from a right hand to a left hand user bag. This process is what took the longest. The shoulder strap is what I’m proud of the most. Materials used were scrap black nylon cloth, padding, metal buckles, plastic quick release, and a nylon belt.

shoulder strap materials

Here is the finished product.

shoulder strap

front of bag

Interchangeable shoulder strap with optional waist band.

right hand
left hand
back

Bicycle thefts make for uneasy riders

Enthusiasts have dark tales of thieves stalking cyclists, scaling balconies for bikes

VANCOUVER — Barry Gilpin, a fan of high-end bicycles for European cycling trips, could ride any bike he wanted. In the Lower Mainland, he chooses to ride a $100 junker because he’s certain his bike will be stolen.

“Vancouver is a very, very bad city for bike theft,” said Mr. Gilpin, owner of Cheapskates stores, which sells 4,000 second-hand bikes on consignment annually. “It’s a big black mark on our city.”

Most information about bike theft is anecdotal, but the Vancouver Police Department alone records $1-million worth of stolen bikes annually. The department says that’s a fraction of the real value because most owners lack serial numbers or identification and don’t report thefts. No one knows how many parts — such as handlebars, seats or wheels — are pinched from bikes locked outside.

“It sounds like such a silly thing, bike theft,” cyclist Bonnie Fenton said. “People don’t think of it as being as serious as car theft. But it’s part of the social question of where we are in our society — and the fact is, it’s an environmental issue.

“We’re trying to encourage people to ride bikes, and cities are creating bike lanes, but there are barriers, and [bike theft] is one of them,” said Ms. Fenton, the departing chairwoman of a Vancouver advisory committee on cycling.

Keep Reading.

I was lucky enough to have a job where I kept my bike in my office. Sucks for the folks that have to leave them unattended at a bike rack.